News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/14/2018

Cancer research philanthropist Sean Parker says the innovations and breakthroughs that will drive a revolution in health care are not likely to come from Amazon or Google. Parker says technology experts who switch to biology "dramatically underestimate the complexity of the human body."

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Sean Parker, Amazon, Google
11/14/2018

An army of social workers, case managers, nurses and colleagues hits the scene for the Department of Veterans Affairs when disasters such as Hurricane Florence and the California wildfires descend. "They have to know we're here, they have to know they're not alone," said Zenia Delgado, a VA housing specialist.

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Military online
11/14/2018

Hundreds of pets and wild animals injured and burned in a wildfire sweeping through the Paradise, Calif., area have been rescued and treated, and others have been evacuated to shelters. Veterinarians and animal rescuers have been working nonstop to save as many animals as they can, but many have been killed.

11/14/2018

The vast majority of animals used in biomedical research are rodents, but pet dogs are prone to many of the same cancers as humans and live in similar environments, and comparative or translational oncology can lead to treatments that benefit both species, says veterinarian Kristen Weishaar, clinical trials director at Colorado State University's Flint Animal Cancer Center. Rodents are still indispensable in cancer research because "there are some things we simply can't do in dogs that you can do in mice," says veterinarian Cheryl London, a professor of comparative oncology at Tufts University's Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

11/14/2018

Ninety percent of more than 600 providers polled by the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives have implemented off-site data backup systems, while 78% and 77% have implemented off-site redundant data centers and storage virtualization, respectively, according to CHIME's 2018 HealthCare's Most Wired survey. Rounding out the list of backup and data-repository processes implemented at health care organizations were cloud services for clinical and nonclinical systems, infrastructure-as-a-service and data-as-a-service.

11/14/2018

Swedish researchers analyzed data on 134 adults with type 2 diabetes, mean age of 59, and found those who lived in a lower socioeconomic status area had a mean A1C of 7.3% and a mean body mass index of 31.2 kg/m2, compared with 6.9% and 29.3 kg/m2 among those living in a central-high socioeconomic status area, respectively. The findings, presented at the ObesityWeek conference, revealed no association between socioeconomic status and waist circumference.

11/14/2018

A study in Diabetes Care showed that increased A1C variability was associated with higher risks for all-cause mortality and incident major adverse cardiovascular events among people without diabetes or CV disease. Danish researchers followed 6,756 individuals, average age of 64.9, for a mean duration of 6.3 years and found that high A1C variability was not tied to an increased risk for type 2 diabetes.

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Endocrinology Advisor
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Diabetes Care
11/14/2018

Patients with diabetes and multiple clogged heart arteries who underwent coronary-artery bypass surgery lived almost three years longer than those who had stents to reopen their blood vessels, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's annual meeting and published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Researchers conducted a follow-up to the landmark FREEDOM trial that involved 1,900 patients and found that 18% of those in the bypass surgery group died over five years, compared with about 24% of those who received stents.

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HealthDay News
11/14/2018

New data from a study evaluating the efficacy of Eisai's Belviq, or lorcaserin, in obese and overweight patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease showed that the drug improved not only glycemic control but primary renal composite outcomes as well. The CAMELLIA-TIMI 61 analyzed lorcaserin's effect on 12,000 study participants, findings of which were published in the journal Circulation and presented at the American Heart Association's annual meeting.

11/14/2018

Researchers from the UK and Australia found an association between a higher body mass index and an increased risk of depression, with women at a 21% higher risk, compared with 8% in men. The findings in the International Journal of Epidemiology, based on 48,791 individuals with depression and 291,995 controls, revealed that "the psychological impact of being obese is likely to cause depression," said lead author Dr. Jess Tyrrell.

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Medical News Today
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depression, Obesity