News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/19/2018

The New York City Administration for Children's Services has been operating a food pantry in the Bronx since last summer to aid families being investigated for child abuse and neglect. Officials say the service is aimed at curbing child removals, but some parent advocates voice concern that acceptance of help may be used as evidence against families.

10/19/2018

Researchers found that Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood could possibly be a hybrid of type 1 and type 2 diabetes because of the variants of the PFKFB3 gene, which "appears to sit at the intersection of both major types of diabetes," said study author Diana Cousminer. The findings in Diabetes Care may help in the development of treatments and to prevent more severe disease.

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Diabetes (UK)
10/19/2018

Sixty-four percent of physicians viewed obesity as a disease, 20% said it is not a disease and 16% were unsure, compared with 54%, 24% and 22% of nurses and advanced practice registered nurses, respectively, according to a Medscape poll. Findings also showed that 80% of physicians and 68% of nurses/APRNs said lifestyle choices were always and often the underlying cause of obesity, and physicians were more likely than nurses/APRNs to recommend surgery and prescription medications to address obesity.

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Obesity
10/19/2018

Dexcom said the CMS has granted its G6 continuous glucose monitoring system coverage as a therapeutic CGM system for Medicare beneficiaries. The system, which continuously monitors glucose levels without the need for fingerstick calibration, will be shipped to Medicare customers beginning early next year, the company said.

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Dexcom, Medicare
10/19/2018

TIME published its Health Care 50 list to showcase people who are transforming the health care sector, and it includes Dr. Scott Gottlieb, head of the FDA, and Bill and Melinda Gates. People who were nominated were evaluated based on the originality, impact and quality of their work.

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TIME online, TIME online
10/19/2018

Prognos CEO Sundeep Bhan says the health care artificial intelligence company, which provides pharmaceutical companies and health plans with insights on disease risk factors, focuses on predictive health because of the importance of information to facilitate early diagnosis and better outcomes. Bhan says one problem in medical decision-making is that big data sets often include information that looks back on what already happened.

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Prognos
10/19/2018

A Moody's Investors Services report said US children's hospitals are expected to continue improved revenue growth, driving margins at least 3 percentage points over what adult hospitals will show next year. Lisa Martin of Moody's said children's hospitals historically have done better than adult hospitals because of high demand for pediatric services and less competition, as well as the ability to tap multiple sources of funding, including gifts.

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FierceHealthcare
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Moody, Lisa Martin
10/19/2018

At the Connected Health Conference in Boston, panelists discussed thoughts and ideas to take into consideration when creating technology for older people. "No matter what the tool may be, one goal of bringing IT to the aging population is to confront issues like isolation and loneliness," writes Erin Dietsche.

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MedCity News
10/19/2018

Older adults with higher pulse wave velocity readings, indicating elevated arterial stiffness, had 60% increased odds of developing dementia after 15 years, compared with those who had lower PWV values, according to a study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. The findings also showed that arterial stiffness, which can be curbed by healthy lifestyle changes and antihypertensive drugs, better predicted dementia than minor brain disease symptoms, prompting researcher Rachel Mackey, Ph.D., MPH, to suggest that dementia onset may be prevented or delayed even in old age.

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CTV (Canada)
10/19/2018

The rate of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer who were found to have therapeutically targeted mutations rose from 20.5% to 35.8% after the integration of plasma next-generation sequencing in standard care, researchers reported in JAMA Oncology. The findings also showed partial or complete treatment response or stable disease among 85.7% of those who underwent plasma NGS result-based targeted therapy.