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Top stories summarized by our editors
1/23/2019

People with disabilities have taken special notice of "Let It Go," the signature song of the hit film and stage show "Frozen" that has resounded far and wide as an anthem to embracing one's differences. "Elsa says, 'I don't care what they're going to say,' and I love that line," says Cara Liebowitz, an advocacy leader who has cerebral palsy and other disorders.

1/23/2019

There was a 14% decline in type 1 diabetes cases among children ages 4 and younger, from 8.7 cases to 7.5 cases for every 100,000 children, eight years after the implementation of a routine oral rotavirus vaccination in Australia in May 2007, according to a study in JAMA Pediatrics. However, the vaccine did not show any significant changes in type 1 diabetes cases among older children.

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Reuters
1/23/2019

Researchers used a cohort of 81 children and adults with lipodystrophy and/or an insulin receptor mutation and found that children with extreme insulin resistance were at an increased risk of developing thyroid nodules, compared with those without the condition. The findings in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism also revealed a higher mean A1C level among children with an insulin receptor mutation than those with lipodystrophy, but not among adults.

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thyroid nodule
1/23/2019

A study in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health showed no significant changes in A1C levels over three years among adults who fell asleep within two hours of eating dinner, compared with those who had more time between eating and sleep, as well as no significant changes between men and women. Japanese researchers analyzed data on more than 1,550 healthy middle-aged and older adults and found that blood pressure, drinking, physical activity levels, smoking, triglycerides and weight were more strongly associated with A1C changes than the amount of time between eating and sleeping.

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HealthDay News
1/23/2019

Teen boys with nonalcoholic fatty live disease who received a low free-sugar diet had a more significant decline in hepatic steatosis after eight weeks, compared with those who continued their usual diet, researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings also showed significantly lower alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, aspartate aminotransferase and total cholesterol among those in the low free sugar diet group.

1/23/2019

Licensed clinical social worker Jennifer Alvaro, who facilitates a program designed to teach adults how to recognize, prevent and respond to child sexual abuse, says talking with children about sexual abuse signs should be as routine as discussions about topics such as seat belt safety. "[T]his is just another conversation we have to have with kids," says Alvaro.

1/23/2019

Arts and crafts offer great value to social and emotional learning, experts say, especially with thorough planning. "Because there is a lot of invention and also trials and tribulations that get worked out in the creative process, a child can learn how to manage frustration," says Marygrace Berberian, a clinical social worker and art therapist.

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SEL
1/23/2019

The first of five Virginia professional licensing boards to take up the issue of gay conversion therapy began the process of banning the practice for minors. The other boards are expected to take action similar to that of the Virginia Board of Psychology.

1/23/2019

Mouse models with familial Alzheimer's disease that were given compounds to repress the epigenetic enzyme that catalyzes repressive histone modification had recovered spatial memory, recognition memory and working memory, as well as restored glutamate receptor expression and functioning in the frontal cortex, for a week, according to a study in the journal Brain. "If many of the dysregulated genes in AD are normalized by targeting specific epigenetic enzymes, it will be possible to restore cognitive function and behavior," researcher Zhen Yan said.

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Medical Xpress
1/23/2019

A Finnish study in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association showed that individuals without epilepsy who had Alzheimer's disease and received antiepileptic drugs had about eight more accumulated hospital days per person-year, compared with those who didn't take antiepileptic drugs. Researchers also found that accumulated hospital days between both groups had the greatest differences for neurological diseases excluding Alzheimer's disease, musculoskeletal and respiratory diseases, and mental and behavioral disorders except dementia.

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EurekAlert!