News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/27/2020

The ACR sent a letter asking the CMS' Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to delay the implementation of its proposed radiation oncology payment model to at least Jan. 1, 2021, amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and provide a new comment period for radiation oncology providers once a final rule is issued to allow stakeholders to detail the impact of the coronavirus. "The ACR does not want RO Model implementation to distract from COVID-19 response and adjustment to regulations," wrote ACR CEO Dr. William Thorwarth.

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Health Imaging online
3/27/2020

Pets are increasingly being allowed at homeless shelters, removing a common barrier to safer living conditions. "Those companion animals can be a really important source of support, of mental stability, among people who experience so much loss and trauma and vulnerability," says Harmony Rhoades, a research associate professor of social work.

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Next City
3/27/2020

Lilly, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi assured customers that supplies of insulin and other diabetes medications will be stable throughout the COVID-19 pandemic as fears of drug shortages rise. The three major insulin manufacturers in the US also offer options for patients with diabetes who cannot afford their insulin, but advised patients to prepare for a rise in demand and possible delays in filling prescriptions in the coming days.

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Sanofi
3/27/2020

A study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that, compared with those without diabetes, transplant patients with diabetes who received hearts from donors without the condition showed "relatively rapid progression of early signs of diabetic heart linked to lipid accumulation in cardiac cells that, ultimately, progressed to heart dysfunction." Based on data from 158 first heart transplant recipients with and without diabetes, the findings also revealed that lipid accumulation was lower in patients with diabetes who took metformin, compared with those who did not take the drug.

3/27/2020

Haven CEO Dr. Atul Gawande said it is time for the US to have a national "shelter-in-place" order. Gawande said lessons are being learned from Washington state, where it appears the death rate is decelerating.

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CNBC
3/27/2020

Waystar Chief Strategy and Product Officer Ric Sinclair says the novel coronavirus pandemic will affect revenue cycles in ways that cannot yet be known, so it is more important to develop and test ideas quickly rather than shut down possibilities before trying them. Some of the top revenue issues affecting health care providers include cancellation of elective surgeries and other care, the move to a remote workforce, and increasing need for uncompensated care.

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HealthLeaders Media
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Ric Sinclair
3/27/2020

Michigan-based Henry Ford Health Systems drafted plans that would deny ventilators and ICU care for patients with the novel coronavirus who have a poor chance of survival. Some US hospitals are considering changing do-not-resuscitate policies and practices for some patients.

3/27/2020

A study of 53 patients with celiac disease who had followed a gluten-free diet for more than two years found 88.7% had at least one fecal or urine sample test positive for gluten immunogenic peptides, researchers reported in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Increasing numbers of patients had samples that were positive for GIP over the course of the four-week study.

3/27/2020

The ACR and five other imaging organizations sent a letter urging President Donald Trump to accelerate the production of personal protective equipment for frontline health care workers to address supply shortfall caused by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, and the groups said they'd be willing to cooperate with state and federal agencies to address shortages. Health care workers "should not be asked to expose themselves to COVID-19 and put their loved ones at risk while performing the wide variety of lifesaving imaging exams that require their talents and expertise," the groups wrote.

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Radiology Business
3/27/2020

Radiologists can manage stress brought by the coronavirus pandemic by being mindful while engaging in daily activities, recognizing their emotions, taking deep breaths and staying optimistic, according to an opinion article published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. "These practices are intended for strengthening burnout prevention and for adding a bit more wellness ... they are intended to build personal resources; they are potential tools in an individual's 'wellness toolbox'," researchers wrote.