News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/26/2019

Scientists have successfully transferred a rhinoceros embryo into a female after fertilizing the southern white rhino's eggs in vitro, and they say the success is evidence the technique could work to help save the nearly extinct northern white subspecies. There are just two northern white rhinos left in the world, and both are female, but scientists have sperm from several males that could be used to preserve the species.

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The Associated Press
6/26/2019

Spillover of Ebola from wildlife to humans is rare, but half of these events and small outbreaks go unreported, according to estimates of the true outbreak and spillover distribution in West Africa since 1976. "It is essential to build up public health and primary healthcare infrastructure in the regions where Ebola spillover occurs," researcher Emma Glennon said.

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West Africa
6/26/2019

Researchers found that patients who used statins to prevent cardiovascular disease had an at least twofold higher risk for type 2 diabetes, especially among those who have used the drug for more than two years, compared with nonusers. Published in Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, findings indicated that statin users may need special guidance on physical activity and diet for preventing diabetes.

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Medical Research
6/26/2019

Senate Finance Committee leaders are discussing ideas for reining in Medicare prescription drug spending, including requiring manufacturers to pay back rebates if price increases exceed the rate of inflation and requiring them to give money back to the program if they launch a new product at a high list price.

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The Hill
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Senate Finance Committee, Senate
6/26/2019

A study presented at the American Diabetes Association annual meeting showed that patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease, with and without cardiovascular disease, who received 100 mg of canagliflozin had reduced risk for CV mortality, stroke and myocardial infarction and a reduction in renal-related adverse events, compared with those on placebo. Findings were based on new subgroup analyses of results from the CREDENCE trial involving 4,401 patients, mean age of 63.

6/26/2019

An emergency insulin bill proposed by Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn., is getting some support from Sen. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., who says that "the cost of this life supporting biologic has increased astronomically and left many unable to afford it." The proposed bill aims to provide state insulin programs for patients who cannot afford the drug and to shorten the exclusivity period from 12 years to seven years.

6/26/2019

A TransUnion Healthcare study found overall out-of-pocket costs climbed 12% across all health care settings in 2018, with inpatient, outpatient and emergency department costs up by over $600, almost $200 and $40, respectively, compared with the previous year. The number of patients who had average out-of-pocket costs between $500 and $1,000 also increased to almost 60% last year from 39% in 2017.

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HealthLeaders Media
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TransUnion Healthcare
6/26/2019

Omada Health has seen success with a digital health business model that ties its payments to outcomes, so CEO Sean Duffy now is focused on becoming a "21st-century provider" and getting people to rely more on digital health care services instead of going to a physician office or hospital. Dan Gebremedhin at Flare Capital Partners said other digital health companies should follow the example by "putting their money where their claims are."

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CNBC
6/26/2019

Following President Donald Trump's executive order on health care price transparency, the industry can look to Danish ready-mix concrete as an example of how it might work out. After the Danish government began requiring ready-mix concrete makers to disclose negotiated prices with customers, prices increased from 15% to 20%.

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Danish government, Donald Trump
6/26/2019

The small Boston nonprofit Institute for Clinical and Economic Review does for the US what governments do in other countries: assess whether the costs of prescription drugs are fair based on their efficacy. While ICER is a watchdog on pharmaceutical prices, Patients Rising, a group mainly funded by pharmaceutical companies, is keeping an eye on whether ICER's decisions are fair.

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WBUR-FM (Boston)
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ICER