News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/20/2019

The CDC reports 52 human cases of salmonellosis linked to backyard poultry in 21 states, with 28% of the cases in children younger than 5. The chickens and ducks were obtained from agricultural stores, online stores and hatcheries, the CDC says.

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USA Today
5/20/2019

Social workers are listed as providers for BetterHelp, Talkspace and 7 Cups of Tea, online therapy services listed in this compilation. Such options may remove barriers some people experience in accessing mental health, such as affordability and lack of transportation, writes Chandra Steele.

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PC Magazine
5/20/2019

A Government Accountability Office report found the CMS is not doing enough to ensure the public knows about major changes to Medicaid, particularly the implementation of work rules through Section 1115 waivers. To improve transparency and avoid inconsistencies, the report urges the CMS to create standard transparency rules for new waivers, extension requests and major changes under Section 1115.

5/20/2019

Smokers who continued the habit after a stroke, using up to 20 cigarettes each day, were at a 68% increased risk for a repeat stroke, compared with nonsmokers, according to findings published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. However, those who quit smoking after their stroke were 29% less likely to experience another stroke than those who continued smoking, according to the study of 3,069 stroke survivors.

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Reuters
5/20/2019

Medicare Part D plans will not be allowed to exclude drugs in protected classes from their formularies, and plans will be required to include information on lower-cost alternatives in monthly explanation of benefits reports sent to patients. Part D plans will be allowed to require prior authorization before covering some therapies.

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CNBC
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Part D
5/20/2019

Researchers found that people whose diet consisted mostly of highly processed foods had an average weight gain of about 0.9 kilograms over two weeks and consumed around 500 calories more daily, compared with losing that same amount of weight over two weeks after eating a diet of minimally processed foods. The findings were published in the journal Cell Metabolism and based on 20 healthy adults.

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CNN
5/20/2019

Individuals with high-normal levels of mean fasting plasma glucose before age 20 had greater volume of white matter hyperintensity and less Stroop activation in midlife, an indication of poorer brain health, than those who had low-normal mean FPG levels, according to a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Researchers analyzed data from the Bogalusa Heart Study involving 1,298 children, ages 3 to 18, and found a significantly greater loss of white matter hyperintensity volume, a trend toward less Stroop activation and less gray matter among those with high-normal FPG values between age 20 to 40, compared with those with low-normal mean FPG.

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Endocrinology Advisor
5/20/2019

Canadian researchers evaluated 5,741 children with diabetes, ages 1 to 17, and found that 25.6% developed diabetic ketoacidosis no more than 3 days after being diagnosed, with DKA incidence rising by 2% each year between 2001 and 2014. The findings in CMAJ Open showed that the highest rates of DKA increase, at 2.7% each year, was observed among children ages 5 to 11.

5/20/2019

When health care company mergers and acquisitions are dropped before or during due diligence, the most common reasons are mistrust, governance issues and incompatible corporate cultures, according to a HealthLeaders survey. The most common financial reasons for not proceeding involved regulatory issues and concerns about the assumption of liabilities.

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HealthLeaders Media
5/20/2019

Health care innovation is needed to meet the growing tsunami of chronic diseases, and solving it will require more basic research, different care models and a culture of collaboration, said Dana-Farber Cancer Institute CEO and President Dr. Laurie Glimcher. US leadership in medical innovation is vital, Glimcher said, but funding for research and development is falling.

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Forbes