News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/12/2018

The "Getting Rid of Stupid Stuff" program implemented at Hawaii Pacific Health in Honolulu removed 10 of the 12 most frequently ignored EHR alerts, such as prompting for "head-to-toe" nursing assessments and asking employees to print after-visit summaries, according to a perspective written by Dr. Melinda Ashton in The New England Journal of Medicine. "It appears that there is stupid stuff all around us, and although many of the nominations we receive aren't for big changes, the small wins that come from acknowledging and improving our daily work do matter," Ashton wrote.

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Hawaii Pacific Health
11/12/2018

Women who had ever received soy-based formula as infants had a 50% increased likelihood of having moderate or severe menstrual pain at ages 18 to 22 and a 40% higher risk of having used hormonal contraception for menstrual discomfort, compared with those who weren't fed soy formula in infancy, researchers reported in the journal Human Reproduction. The findings were based on data involving 1,553 African-American women ages 23 to 35.

11/12/2018

Dustin Pearson draws on his experience in the Army and the difficulty he experienced transitioning to civilian life to help veteran students at Texas A&M University-Commerce adjust. "Being able to help veterans at my alma mater has been a special experience for me," says Pearson, who holds a social work degree.

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Army
11/12/2018

The Lucia Mar Unified School District in San Luis Obispo County, Calif., is joining the growing ranks of school systems adopting trauma-informed approaches to student behavior issues. "Now, we're asking people instead of just telling them what not to do, maybe give that student two minutes of your time every day and get to know that student on a different level," said Wendy Bruse, coordinator of the initiative.

11/12/2018

Iowa's suicide rate is at its highest level in more than a decade, leading educators and government officials to take extensive measures to monitor student mental health. A Des Moines-area teen's death by suicide was a catalyst for a law signed this year calling for mandatory teacher training on suicide prevention, beginning next summer.

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The Associated Press
11/12/2018

A judge who spearheaded a court program aimed at helping homeless people in St. Joseph, Mo., is suggesting extending its services to people with mental illness. Municipal Judge John Boeh said the venture for which he enlisted the United Way and police department has had success with some individuals and is growing in enrollment.

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United Way
11/12/2018

Alcohol consumption can make losing weight more challenging and calorie counts for drinks vary based on alcohol content, total volume and the amount of carbohydrates, sugars and mixers, writes registered dietitian Lisa Drayer. RD Ginger Hultin said drinks such as margaritas and pina coladas can have upwards of 500 calories, which can be a problem for people who want to lose weight.

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CNN
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Lisa Drayer, Ginger Hultin
11/12/2018

People who stepped on the scale daily were more likely to lose weight than those who weighed themselves rarely or not at all, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. Registered dietitian Martha McKittrick said regular weight tracking can remind people to eat healthy and stay away from tempting treats but for some, weighing too often could reduce self-esteem and increase anxiety.

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CBS News
11/12/2018

When Gourmet Dining took over as the food service provider at Rider University in New Jersey, it also began to cover costs of the school's participation in the local Meals on Wheels program. Gourmet Dining had its on-campus registered dietitian oversee a healthier and safer Meals on Wheels menu, which has led to positive comments from residents about higher quality food.

11/12/2018

Researchers found that children with acute flaccid myelitis who were given fluoxetine had a 0.2-point decline in muscle strength scores after seven months, compared with a 2.5-point increase among those who didn't receive treatment. The findings in Neurology, based on 2015 to 2016 data involving 56 youths with AFM ages 30 months to 9 years, should prompt the development of better treatments and prevention strategies for AFM, said researcher Dr. Kevin Messacar.

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fluoxetine, AFM