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11/15/2019

A more comprehensive method to assess abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture risk after surgical repair was developed by researchers who used a biomechanical strain analysis of computed tomography angiography scans, according to findings published in Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology. The study, based on 22 patients who had endovascular aneurysm repair for an AAA, showed that the technique had an 88.6% area under the curve on average for estimating long-term prognosis of patients.

11/15/2019

Children who had their initial congenital heart disease surgery within 10 years of birth had increased cumulative end-stage kidney disease and all-cause mortality incidence at one, five and 10 years, compared with the general population, researchers reported in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The findings also linked greater CHD severity with increased odds of ESKD and death, with youths who had hypoplastic left heart syndrome having the highest risk.

11/15/2019

Researchers in Japan and Germany found that mouse tissue models of prostate cancer that were given F-18-PSMA-1007 with lower peptide concentrations or molar activity levels had reduced tracer uptake in tumors and the salivary gland, compared with those who received the tracer with elevated peptide or MA levels. The findings in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine prompted researchers to conclude that PSMA-targeted therapy with suitable MA levels may treat tumors while curbing negative side effects to the salivary gland among patients with prostate cancer.

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Health Imaging online
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prostate cancer
11/15/2019

Individuals whose partners died were 43% and 24% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia after three and six months, respectively, compared with those whose partners didn't die, UK researchers reported in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. However, the findings, based on data involving more than 200,000 people ages 40 and older in the UK, don't suggest a direct association between partner bereavement and dementia.

11/15/2019

Drug implant technology has been around since the 1960s and has been limited to delivering drugs for treating prostate cancer, periodontitis, and schizophrenia. Purdue University researchers have developed a new method that uses an MRI to see how an implant design affects the amount of a drug released into the body, which could increase the number of implant formulations that can be used for patient treatment.

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Medical Xpress
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Purdue University
11/15/2019

Janice Lundy, a social worker at a rural hospital in Missouri, wanted to address frailty and cognitive decline in seniors there, but an intervention needed to be developed. She traveled to London for certification in cognitive stimulation therapy, eventually training others in the practice and creating a program of stand-alone exercise and group CST sessions that aim to improve memory recall and physical function.

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Next Avenue
11/15/2019

The Department of Health and Human Services has given a five-year, $143,000 grant to the Healthy Start program in Louisville, Ky., to add mental health care. A social worker will make home visits, and families will be able to attend support groups led by social worker Ana'Neicia Williams.

11/15/2019

Hospitals should have a centralized response plan for active-shooter events that identifies one decision-maker for the operating room, post-anesthesia-care unit, ICU, emergency department and other critical-care areas, researchers wrote in the journal Surgery. No large urban trauma hospitals with an active-shooter Incident Action Plan that were examined had one that included how to conduct ongoing care delivery in the OR and other critical care units, the authors wrote.

11/15/2019

A high level of mindfulness, or the ability to maintain focus on the present moment, was linked to less fatigue, pain, depression, anxiety and sleep issues among women with metastatic breast cancer, according to a study in the journal Psycho-Oncology. Researchers analyzed data from 64 women and found that "not judging or reacting to symptoms may be helpful to the physical body by lowering the fight-or-flight stress response and inducing a relaxation response," said study author Lauren Zimmaro.

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HealthDay News
11/15/2019

People use online personalized vitamin services that provide supplement plans based on lifestyle, health issues and sometimes genetic tests, but registered dietitian Jennifer Cholewka says little evidence shows supplements significantly improve health. Cholewka says if people have a balanced diet and healthful lifestyle, there is no need for a multivitamin.

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WebMD