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10/16/2018

Almost 20% of low-income adults in states that did not expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act said they went without needed medical care in the past year due to cost compared with 9.4% of those in states with Medicaid expansion, according to a report from the Government Accountability Office. The report, using federal data from 2016, found the poor in states without Medicaid expansion were more likely to say they took less medication than prescribed, passed on dental care or didn't see necessary specialists.

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The Associated Press
10/16/2018

Half of 726 parents surveyed reported that their children ages 2 to 5 were afraid of going to the doctor, with fear of immunization and stranger anxiety being the most common reasons, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The findings also showed that child distress prompted 9% of parents to avoid asking questions or raising concerns during appointments, 4% to postpone vaccinations and 3% to cancel visits.

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HealthDay News
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C.S. Mott Children
10/16/2018

Orthopedics firm Zimmer Biomet, in collaboration with Apple, launched a multi-year study that will allow surgeons to use Apple Watches to monitor activities, including heart rate, steps taken and standing hours, of up to 100,000 patients who are due to undergo or are recovering from hip and knee replacement surgery in Massachusetts, California, Michigan and Colorado. Using the smartwatch, providers will be able to evaluate how well patients are following prescribed physiotherapy or regimes before and after surgery.

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Reuters
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Apple, Zimmer Biomet
10/16/2018

Children deal with anxiety related to trauma by either being overly aroused behaviorally or shutting down, which is a different response than adults, says social worker Jean West of the St. Joseph, Mo., school district. West uses the Structured Sensory Interventions for Traumatized Children, Adolescents and Parents -- SITCAP -- approach to integrate trauma's sensory and cognitive aspects.

10/16/2018

Veterinary cardiologist Ryan Fries says hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is behind about 80% of feline heart disease cases and is especially prevalent in Maine coon and ragdoll cats. Signs of heart trouble may be subtle and include fatigue, anorexia and lameness in a rear leg, and an echocardiogram is required for a definitive diagnosis, Dr. Fries says.

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cardiomyopathy
10/16/2018

Brain imaging showed that dogs know the difference between words they have been taught and words they've never heard, but their neural reaction is different than humans', researchers reported in Frontiers in Neuroscience. Auditory regions in dogs' brains became active when their owners called out unfamiliar words, whereas the sound of familiar words usually causes greater neural activation in people, suggesting that the dogs were working to understand the unfamiliar words' meaning.

10/16/2018

Researchers surveyed 376 individuals who worked in public health and found that implementing and supporting evidence-based diabetes management interventions at local health departments could help control diabetes across the US. The findings in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care revealed that among the implemented evidence-based interventions, the Diabetes Prevention Program is offered by 82% of the local health departments, while 81% offered diabetes self-management education and 67% offered diabetes screening and referrals.

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Endocrinology Advisor
10/16/2018

Infants and children with congenital hyperinsulinism experienced adverse events 48 days after receiving diazoxide treatment, including prematurity, pulmonary hypertension, neutropenia, edema and higher baseline risk, according to a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Based on 295 patients with a median age of 29 days at diazoxide initiation, researchers note the importance of monitoring children on diazoxide for common adverse events.

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Endocrinology Advisor
10/16/2018

Men who were classified as overweight or obese in their 20s and 30s are expected to lose eight years and ten years of life, respectively, while women who are overweight or obese are predicted to lose up to six years and eight years of life, respectively, researchers reported in the International Journal of Obesity. The findings, based on 12,091 adults ages 20 to 69, showed that obesity was associated with a reduced life expectancy of 4.1 years among women in their 40s and 5.1 years among men in their 40s.

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Obesity
10/16/2018

A study published in Heart Rhythm revealed no evidence that sudden cardiac arrest was more likely to happen on Mondays, as was previously believed, and just 13.9% of 1,535 adults who died from sudden cardiac arrest died between 12 a.m. and 6 a.m. Researchers analyzed data from The Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study and found that increased stress levels were associated with an increased likelihood of sudden cardiac arrest at any time.

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Healthline