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5/24/2019

A major government overhaul of the health care system such as Medicare for All could lead to fewer health care jobs -- one estimate puts the loss at 2 million -- but some economists and policy experts say it's time to look beyond the initial transition to the good the change could bring to the US economy. Stanford University economist and physician Dr. Kevin Schulman said focusing on potential losses in health care ignores the painful effects of high medical costs on the rest of the economy.

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Kaiser Health News
5/24/2019

CaptureRX CEO Chris Hotchkiss, described by co-workers and friends as eccentric and "like a resurrected hippie," is leading his company's battle against competition from pharmacy chains that have cut into the bottom line. Hotchkiss says he has a strategy for the company, which helps hospitals and clinics manage 340B drug discount program compliance, admits he's unsure about the company's future and says he'll keep fighting.

5/24/2019

A bipartisan group of House lawmakers released details of a proposal meant to protect patients against surprise medical bills for out-of-network care through a "baseball-style" arbitration process. AHIP said it is concerned that the "proposal relies on a costly and cumbersome system of dispute resolution that utilizes inflated charges of certain specialty providers to determine payment. These arbitrary rates bear no relation to the cost of care and this approach would likely lead to increased healthcare spending at a time we need solutions to reduce costs for patients."

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AHIP
5/24/2019

Amgen's Corlanor, or ivabradine, has been approved by the FDA as a treatment for patients at least 6 months old with stable symptomatic heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy who are in sinus rhythm with an elevated heart rate. In a study, treatment with Corlanor led to a higher proportion of patients who achieved target heart rate reduction versus placebo use.

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eMPR
5/24/2019

The leaders and ranking members of the House Ways and Means Committee and the Energy and Commerce Committee released the discussion draft of legislation meant to limit beneficiaries' out-of-pocket spending on prescription drugs in Medicare Part D and reduce the government's portion of catastrophic coverage from 80% to 20% over a four-year period. Stakeholders are invited to submit input on the proposals by June 6.

5/24/2019

A bill that will limit the cost of insulin for patients with diabetes to no more than $100 per month has been signed into law by Colorado Gov. Jared Polis. The law, which will take effect in January, will also require the state attorney general to investigate the recent spike in insulin prices and submit findings by November 2020.

5/24/2019

Facilities Management Services and Heine Brothers' Coffee in Louisville, Ky., are partnering with a nonprofit group to help their employees pay for bags of fresh produce this summer. The companies are located in an area where there are only two grocery stores for more than 13,000 residents, and an FMS survey found employees wanted better access to fresh food.

5/24/2019

Adolescents ages 15.5 to 18 had reduced odds of receiving meningococcal conjugate MenACWY vaccination and had a higher likelihood of missed vaccination opportunities, compared with those ages 10.5 to 13, according to a study in the Journal of Adolescent Health. Reduced MenACWY uptake among older teens was due to fewer vaccinations and preventive care visits, as well as increased interaction with nonpediatric health providers, researchers said.

5/24/2019

The Community FoodBank of New Jersey, Southern Branch, has increased the number of children receiving summer meals and is now focused on distributing healthful meals and providing nutrition education. "It is going to be a more pronged approach to feeding hungry children, not just filling them with food, but filling them with the right food with a concentration on fresh food and vegetables, and also education," said Renate Taylor, the food bank's development officer.

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New Jersey
5/24/2019

Individuals with mild cognitive impairment, especially those with positive cerebrospinal fluid markers signifying Alzheimer's disease, had worse performance in a virtual reality navigation task, compared with those who were cognitively healthy, UK researchers reported in the journal Brain. The findings also showed that the VR test better distinguished low-risk MCI patients from high-risk ones, compared with standard cognitive tests.

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EurekAlert!
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Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer