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7/17/2019

Provisions in a Senate bill aimed at reducing health care spending that would facilitate the development of generic and biosimilar drugs would reduce the federal deficit by $3.7 billion over a 10-year period, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

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Regulatory Focus
7/17/2019

Takeda Pharmaceutical is working to become one of the first firms to develop FDA-approved off-the-shelf gene therapies. Its in-house manufacturing facility in Boston is nearing completion, while the company continues to enter new partnerships, such as an agreement with Memorial Sloan Kettering's Michel Sadelain, one of the pioneers in the field of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, as well as a collaboration with British biotech GammaDelta.

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Endpoints News
7/17/2019

A new guide from the National Quality Forum outlines actions health systems, health plans, and clinicians can take to implement medication assistance treatment for those with opioid use disorder. "Many of the current barriers that prohibit clinicians from implementing MAT are organizational and consequently require executive-level support from healthcare delivery systems and healthcare insurers alike," according to the NQF.

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NQF
7/17/2019

There may not be a one-policy-fits-all approach to lowering the cost of prescription drug prices, partly because of the impact competition has on pricing for generics and brands, experts said. Reducing drug prices also may affect drug development and drug shortages.

7/17/2019

Arbutus Biopharma unveiled positive results from its Phase Ia/Ib trial assessing its candidate AB-506, a hepatitis B virus capsid inhibitor, developed to treat patients with chronic HBV infection, while also being tested in healthy volunteers. Final results will be presented at a future scientific conference.

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Seeking Alpha
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HBV, Arbutus BioPharma, Arbutus
7/17/2019

Researchers used a cohort of 842 patients and found that patient portal use among individuals ages 60 to 69 was 45% less than those ages 18 to 29, while black patients used the tool 40% less than white patients. Published in the journal Telemedicine and e-Health, findings also showed that the patient portal's tutorial feature was used more often by older patients than younger patients.

7/17/2019

Forty-seven percent, 22% and nearly 17% of young adults said they would reduce e-cigarette use and increase consumption of traditional tobacco cigarettes if nicotine was eliminated from e-cigarettes, if the ability to victimize e-cigarettes was removed and if e-cigarette flavors were limited, respectively, researchers reported in the journal Substance Use & Misuse. The findings were based on data involving 240 young adults ages 18 to 29 who used both e-cigarettes and tobacco.

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HealthDay News
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nicotine
7/17/2019

African American mothers more frequently reported unsafe infant sleep practices in surveys with a research assistant than during safe sleep discussions with health educators and well-baby visits with pediatricians, according to a study in JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers said that the number and specificity of questions on unsafe infant practices prompted the differences in maternal disclosure rates.

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2 Minute Medicine
7/17/2019

Infants whose mothers underwent surgery prior to pregnancy were 1.63 times more likely to develop neonatal abstinence syndrome compared with those whose mothers didn't have surgery, researchers reported in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, with even greater odds of NAS among those whose mothers had at least three prepregnancy surgeries and those whose mothers were younger than 15 during their first surgery. The findings also showed the highest NAS risk among those whose mothers received cardiothoracic surgery, urologic surgery and neurosurgery.

7/17/2019

Coconut aminos and nutritional yeast are two formerly fringe ingredients, often used for flavoring foods, that have become mainstream, writes registered dietitian nutritionist Ellie Krieger. Coconut aminos can be used instead of soy sauce for people with celiac disease but some health claims associated with it have not been substantiated, Krieger says, and nutritional yeast contains essential nutrients but should be avoided by people with irritable bowl disease, glaucoma and hypertension.

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Ellie Krieger, celiac disease