Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/12/2018

Interactions between light and matter occurring at the nanoscale can finally be revealed with a camera that captures 10 trillion images per second, which is believed to be the fastest in the world. The camera, developed by researchers at Montreal's Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique and Caltech, combines earlier technologies -- compressed ultrafast photography, a femtosecond streak camera and a static camera -- to achieve its speed and provide fresh insights into the near-instantaneous worlds of biology and physics.

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New Atlas
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Caltech
10/12/2018

In light of the limousine crash in Schoharie, N.Y., that killed 20 people, Chris Ferrone, a mechanical engineer at ARCCA, explains the mechanical makeup of limos and offers resources passengers can use to evaluate vehicle safety.

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WGN-AM (Chicago)
10/12/2018

Scientists have used mathematical modeling and computer data to simulate how variants of Alzheimer's disease spread through the brain. "What our model does is connect the dots between the static data points, mathematically, to show disease progression in unprecedented detail," said Ellen Kuhl, a professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University.

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PhysOrg/News release
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Alzheimer, Stanford University
10/11/2018

Boeing will be providing technical support, maintenance and rebuilding services for the navigation subsystem of the main submarine-launched nuclear ballistic missile used by the US and the UK. The Trident II D5 contract is worth $26.7 million, and work is expected to be finished in September 2020.

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Boeing
10/11/2018

The USS Blue Ridge is back at sea after two years of maintenance at Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan. The Navy's oldest ship in operation was originally scheduled for 14 months of work beginning in June 2016, but unanticipated plant issues delayed the completion.

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Yokosuka Naval Base, Navy
10/11/2018

Wohlers Report publisher Terry Wohlers is a 30-year veteran in 3D printing who believes the industry is "just beginning to scratch the surface" of what's possible with the technology. Reflecting on the state of the technology in an interview with ASME, Wohlers offers insight on the economic challenges associated with additive manufacturing and where it's headed.

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ASME
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Terry Wohlers, ASME
10/11/2018

Russia has been urged to send observers to watch what is said to be NATO's largest exercise in 16 years -- a simulated reaction to a hypothetical Russian attack on Norway. The Trident Juncture exercise begins Oct. 25, and 45,000 troops will participate.

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The Associated Press
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NATO
10/11/2018

Raytheon will provide engineering services for AN/SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar, or AMDR, production under a $22.7 million contract that also covers travel costs. The AMDR, which is put together via modular assembly, will be installed first on Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers.

10/11/2018

L3 Technologies is developing a business unit dedicated to autonomous-vessel technologies in preparation for the next era of Navy purchases. "I would predict there will come a time when every manned vessel has an autonomous capability built into it, might even be required by regulation," said Bill Toti, president of L3 Maritime Sensor Systems and a retired Navy submarine captain.

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L3 Technologies, Bill Toti, Navy
10/11/2018

The Navy's 71st Arleigh Burke-class destroyer has been christened in honor of Frank E. Petersen Jr., the first black aviator and general in the Marine Corps.