Industry News
Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/21/2022

According to the project website, construction began in July 2017. The Iowa-bound bridge opened in November 2020, and the Illinois-bound bridge was finished last month. Additional work, including landscaping and demolition of the old bridge, is anticipated to begin in 2022. According to RJ Watson, the firm who submitted this photo to SmartBrief, engineers had to ensure the disc bearings could accommodate 13% of the vertical load.

Full Story:
smartbrief.com
1/21/2022

The American Society of Civil Engineers has launched a site to help members learn more on the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. The IIJA Implementation Resource Center features "open grant applications, announcements on funding decisions, opportunities to influence implementation and upcoming deadlines, all sorted by Report Card category," according to a press release.

1/21/2022

The innovative financing behind the Fargo-Moorhead Area Diversion's public-private partnership has earned the project an Americas P3 Deal of the Year award from Project Finance International. The $2.75 billion project, which is designed to protect the metro area encompassing Fargo, N.D., and Moorhead, Minn., from extreme flooding, is also the first to achieve a financial close under the US Army Corps of Engineers' P3 pilot program.

1/21/2022

Manual procedures make the management of construction materials on transportation projects burdensome, writes HeadLight CEO George White. Digitization can provide an answer, but only if systems have open architecture and cloud-based access, so that key data is stored in a central repository.

SmartTake: HeadLight's advocacy on this topic isn't limited to thought pieces. It is part of the Coalition for Smarter Infrastructure Investments, which has been campaigning for bureaucratic changes that incentivize the use of digital technologies that make infrastructure projects more efficient. With material shortages taking center stage in construction right now, anything that streamlines the process adds value. --Evan

Full Story:
Roads & Bridges
1/21/2022

Buro Happold has become the latest engineering firm to sign onto the pledge to greatly reduce carbon emissions led by the American Society of Civil Engineers' Structural Engineering Institute. The pledge sets a target date of 2050, but Buro Happold had already set its sights on halving embodied carbon by 2030.

Full Story:
Dezeen
1/21/2022

Possible complications from groundwater should be carefully conceptualized and modeled early in civil projects to avoid costly solutions later, advises UK groundwater expert Martin Preene. But good models depend on good data that, among other things, take into account significant variations in groundwater at different times of year.

1/21/2022

Choosing the most efficient, safe and environmentally friendly way to dispose of solid waste can be tricky, but a new open-source software from researchers at North Carolina State University can help. Users of the Solid Waste Optimization Life-cycle in Python tool get a quick, data-based assessment of their current operations, as well as a suggested combination of processes to help meet their goals.

1/21/2022

During the 19th century, surgeons began thinking about interventions to restore mobility to patients suffering from advanced joint disease in their knees. Who is credited with performing the first total knee replacement?

  French surgeon Paul-Michel Genou, using mahogany knees in 1861.
  Scottish surgeon Gordon Mayo, using silver knees in 1873.
  German surgeon Themistocles Gluck, using ivory knees in 1890.
  Greek physician Galen of Pergamon, using a knee from a pig, in 182 A.D.
Full Story:
ASME
1/20/2022

Sensors spread around a 2.7-square-mile section of Las Vegas provide data through a 5G network to create a digital twin of the downtown area. The twin will be used to provide insights for energy usage, emissions, traffic and parking and other stakeholder purposes.

Full Story:
Construction Dive
1/20/2022

The bipartisan infrastructure law directs $4.2 billion to the California Department of Transportation's bridge-repair program, and $849.4 million of that will come this fiscal year. The state has 1,500 bridges deemed in "poor" condition.

Full Story:
Transportation Today