Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/23/2019

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is developing technology that allows soldiers to use brain activity to interface with the systems they use. The agency is now providing funds to six groups to explore the possibilities of non-invasive neurotechnologies.

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IEEE Spectrum online
5/23/2019

Just about any engineering field having to do with data, electronics and cybersecurity is highly lucrative as employers compete for job candidates. However, international students in the US are finding the market somewhat less welcoming due to uncertainty over the H1-B visa program, although the global market remains vibrant.

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IEEE Spectrum online
5/22/2019

Mercedes-Benz is testing a number of innovations in its latest Experimental Safety Vehicle, including exterior screens that communicate to other drivers and a deployable robotic safety triangle for when the car is disabled. Another feature draws on the car's system of sensors to work even when parked, serving to alert passing pedestrians if they're about to walk into the path of a moving vehicle.

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New Atlas
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Mercedes, Mercedes-Benz
5/22/2019

A team at Arizona State University has developed an artificial tree that looks nothing like its natural counterpart but can extract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere 1,000 times faster. The tree has a sorbent made of anionic exchange resins that absorb and bind CO2 as a bicarbonate ion when dry and, when wet, form a carbonate ion.

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ASME
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Arizona State University
5/22/2019

Agility Robotics, a startup that's designed walking, upright robots, has partnered with Ford. The companies say they will deploy as many as 100 self-driving Ford vehicles equipped with the robot, which can deliver packages.

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Ford, Agility Robotics
5/22/2019

More than 50 people competed in the Navy's Print Sprint II to encourage development of 3D printing for shipyards and fleet support. The San Diego event focuses on the potential of additive manufacturing "to revolutionize the navy's supply chain" by "advancing and maturing this capability within and across Navy maintenance depots," said Naval Sea Systems Command Tactical Innovation Implementation Lab Director Janice Bryant.

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Naval Technology
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Naval Sea Systems
5/21/2019

Drones are increasingly being used for purposes such as weather monitoring and infrastructure inspection, says an American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials survey. "Drones are a perfect tool for any job that is dangerous or dirty," says Jared Esselman of the Utah Department of Transportation.

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The Associated Press
5/21/2019

Facebook developed three types of maps that aim to use artificial intelligence, publicly available census information and satellite imagery to improve disease outbreak responses around the world. The maps, which became available for free download on Monday, can be used to predict the location of outbreaks of diseases such as cholera, flu and malaria; identify whether digital solutions such as telehealth may help patients; and help organizations with resource allocation decisions.

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Facebook, flu
5/21/2019

Spiders have tiny hairs on their legs that help them distinguish between insignificant vibrations and ones that indicate danger or prey. Engineers at Purdue University are working to develop a material that will perform the same function for autonomous vehicles, serving as a "mechanosensor" to distinguish between factors in the immediate environment that require attention and those that do not.

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New Atlas
5/21/2019

Years of accelerating erosion along the banks of Alaska's Kuskokwim River took a heavy toll in Napakiak, which recently lost the bank where residents landed their boats. Storms also washed away large sections of ground near a school and fuel tanks.