Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/19/2019

In pursuit of greater understanding of the physics of swimming fish and more efficient propulsion for underwater vehicles, mechanical engineers from the University of Virginia and biologists at Harvard University teamed up to produce a robot that moves like a yellowfish tuna. The 10-inch "Tunabot" is designed to rapidly bend its body and tail in response to the speed of the water current around it.

9/18/2019

Exoskeleton technology dates back to military development in the 1960s, and currently the technology is used in a range of fields, and standards for exoskeletons are being developed. BMW, Ford and Boeing are among the companies using exoskeletons.

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ASTM International
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BMW, Boeing, Ford
9/18/2019

A report released by Negotiation Design & Strategy outlines the danger of 3D printing technology being used to create weapons of mass destruction. 3D printers have already been widely used to build a handgun.

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Forbes
9/18/2019

Global standards developer ASTM International announced its second round of funding to support research that helps expedite standards in additive manufacturing (3D printing). This investment of $300,000 and in-kind contributions will support the ASTM International Additive Manufacturing Center of Excellence’s goal of addressing pressing needs for technical standardization in this fast-growing industry. Read more here.

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astm.org
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ASTM International
9/18/2019

The scope and capabilities of 3D printing are advancing rapidly with new developments in the hardware, software and materials used. Mark Crawford looks at six examples of innovation in the field, including uses in medicine, construction and food.

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ASME
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Mark Crawford
9/17/2019

An old law prevents Florida's beach communities from acquiring sand from abroad to replenish beaches, but Sen. Marco Rubio, D-Fla., is reviving a proposal to change that. Citing the recent need created by Hurricane Dorian, Rubio said the legislation "will improve beach renourishment efforts by encouraging greater flexibility in acquiring the best sand for Florida beaches at the best value for federal, state and local taxpayers."

9/17/2019

More than 4,000 structures to control erosion have been erected over the past century in Arizona's Upper Gila River watershed, most in the San Simon Valley, according to an inventory conducted by Eastern Arizona College. Now a coordinated effort is under way to evaluate which of these decades-old structures are worthy of maintenance and preservation.

9/17/2019

Scott Douglass, a professor emeritus at the University of South Alabama and civil engineer, has taken it upon himself to study the curious phenomenon of sand cliffs several feet high that occur along the calm Gulf Coast of Alabama and the Florida panhandle. So far Douglass is casting doubt on the role of neap tides and beach renourishment projects as causes.

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University of South Alabama
9/17/2019

Greencastle Borough in Franklin County, Pa., offers an example of the high cost of compliance with MS4 requirements imposed to help clean up Chesapeake Bay. Some residents say the burden is unfair, as most sediment runoff stems from areas that are not urbanized, and therefore off the hook for addressing the problem.

9/17/2019

A report of excessive downstream sediment in Colorado's Boulder Creek has prompted a state compliance check on a Boulder Canyon construction project. At issue is the Colorado 119 upgrade project near the Eben Fine Park and other locations, according to a complaint filed by Boulder Waterkeeper.