Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/13/2018

The clotting ability of blood crucial to healing wounds also may pose a risk of stroke or heart attacks, but clinicians have little way to assess the danger. Australian National University researchers are taking a holistic approach to the problem with a microfluidic device with channels coated with collagen to imitate a blood vessel and using a holographic microscope they developed to help assess the clotting potential of a blood sample.

11/12/2018

Over the weekend, aerospace manufacturer Rocket Lab launched its two-stage Electron rocket featuring nine kerosene-fueled engines and a Rutherford engine, a mostly 3D-printed design. It placed six small satellites and a drag sail experiment into orbit.

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Gizmodo Australia
11/12/2018

Potable water is becoming rarer and more precious worldwide, putting a high priority on the detection of water loss through leaks. WatchTower Robotics has developed a soft robot the size of a softball that can detect leaks as it's carried along by ordinary water flow through a pipe.

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ASME
11/12/2018

People afflicted with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or cystic fibrosis face the danger of an excessive buildup of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream. Breathing regular oxygen can relieve symptoms but does nothing to remove the CO2, and that's where a new machine comes in, operating something like kidney dialysis by channeling blood out of the body to extract the unwanted gas and returning the cleansed blood to the patient.

11/12/2018

Japanese manufacturers are using machines and technology not only to raise efficiency -- a matter of pride in Japan -- but also to create something they call a "comfortable working environment." This is increasingly a necessity amid a tight labor market and an aging population, adding pressure to be more productive while keeping workers on the job and healthy.

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The Fabricator online
11/12/2018

California, like Germany, will likely face a series of challenges as it overhauls its energy mix and moves toward 100% zero-carbon electrical generation, writes Rob Nikolewski. "Somewhere between 60 and 100 percent, I think we're going to hit a big cost spike and then we'll have to think about how we buy renewables," says James Bushnell of the University of California at Davis.

11/12/2018

For the past 45 years, the ASME Federal Government Fellowship Program has offered engineers the opportunity to share their engineering and technical expertise with US legislators during the policy-making process. Four society members have been selected to serve as ASME Federal Fellows in 2018-2019. Since the program was launched in 1973, 125 ASME members have served as ASME Federal Fellows, providing technical advice to policy makers and key federal agencies as independent, unbiased advisors in engineering, science and technology.

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asme.org
11/8/2018

A Danish maker of electric bicycles is scaling up his experience to four wheels and four passengers with an electric crossover utility vehicle. Biomega's Sin design features a carbon fiber composite body and aluminum crossbeams and can reach speeds up to 80 mph while boasting a range of 100 miles between charges.

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New Atlas
11/8/2018

The job of a camera's lens is to arrange light so it can be interpreted by human beings viewing the image produced, but it can be replaced by anything else that does the same job. Rajesh Menon, a professor of computer engineering at the University of Utah, has developed an algorithm to do just that, and his work could inspire future lens-free cameras for autonomous vehicles.

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ASME
11/8/2018

With the construction sector increasingly relying on robots to work hand in hand with human workers to optimize construction, QYResearch projects the market for construction robotics to reach $420 million by the end of 2025. Laurie Cowin provides an overview of the construction robotics landscape, including semi-automated masons, the BrickBot and the SpotMini.

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Construction Dive
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Laurie Cowin