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6/2/2020

The $2 weekly user fee levied on employees in Wheeling, W.Va., would remain in effect even if the city acquires the Ohio Valley Medical Center to house its new public safety building instead of constructing new facilities, City Manager Robert Herron says. Revenue from the fee will be directed to other public safety services if the city opts to use the OVMC, Herron adds.

6/2/2020

Officials with Lake County, S.D., 911 Communications are asking residents not to hang up without speaking to a dispatcher when they accidentally call 911 and to avoid letting small children play with phones, noting that all hang-ups have to be investigated by law enforcement officials. County 911 communications director April Denholm says her staff received 24 accidental calls during the Memorial Day weekend, and only one of those callers stayed on the line to explain the error.

6/2/2020

Erosion control is part of a newly completed 1,100-foot section of the Sugar Hill greenway in Atlanta. The greenway is planned to extend 16 miles through the city, and bidding is now open for completion of Phase 1.

6/2/2020

City officials in Yamato, Japan, are hoping to reduce unnecessary accidents caused by cellphone use with a rule that would ban phone use while walking. If approved, the new rule would go into effect July 1.

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Daily Mail (London)
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Yamato
6/2/2020

City Manager Peter Zanoni of Corpus Christi, Texas, hopes to promote health and wellness among the city's residents with the launch of a local fitness program that includes regular events and the creation of an expanded fitness space on Saturdays. "The fitness lane will help to reduce overcrowding of the sidewalks and enable social distancing of at least 6 feet while exercising," city officials say.

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Peter Zanoni
6/2/2020

The pandemic has highlighted the possibility of 9-1-1 professionals doing more work remotely, and agencies should consider allowing this, writes retired 9-1-1 center director Barry Furey. With remote work, "[t]elecommunicators can log in immediately when they are needed most -- during the first few minutes of developing emergencies," he writes.

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Barry Furey
6/2/2020

The governors of Virginia and Pennsylvania signed emergency declarations over the weekend to provide National Guard troops and other assistance to cities experiencing violent protests of the killing of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis. The mayor of Nashville, Tenn., also declared a state of civil emergency.

6/2/2020

Police in Bellevue, Wash., asked residents to refrain from calling 9-1-1 about looting around the city over the weekend, saying that dispatchers needed to be able to receive calls about emergencies. The police said they were aware of the looting and were addressing it.

Full Story:
KIRO-TV (Seattle)
6/2/2020

Police in Seattle have asked people to call 9-1-1 if they witness racist harassment, citing a spate of verbal and physical attacks on Asian Americans amid the coronavirus pandemic. "A person who is actively being victimized is not going to be able oftentimes to be the one to call 9-1-1," says Detective Elizabeth Wareing of the police department's Bias Crimes Unit.

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KUOW-FM (Seattle)
6/2/2020

A bill under consideration in New York state would make it a hate crime to file a false police report alleging criminal activity by members of protected groups. The move comes after a white woman falsely claimed in a 9-1-1 call that a black man was threatening her in Central Park.

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CBS News