Lab Sciences
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/20/2019

Genetic sequencing data on 600 people who died from cardiac arrest and 600 controls revealed 14 genetic mutations related to sudden cardiac death. The study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and presented at the American Heart Association's annual meeting, found that all 15 people who carried at least one of the genetic variants had died from sudden cardiac arrest, and 41 of more than 4,500 healthy controls who carried at least one genetic mutation, followed for a median of 14 years, had a three times higher risk of sudden cardiac death.

Full Story:
HealthDay News
11/19/2019

Valneva of France said an early-stage trial of its experimental chikungunya vaccine found sustained protection from a single injection through 12 months. A midstage trial is underway and a late-stage trial is being planned for next year.

Full Story:
Labiotech (Germany)
11/19/2019

LUNAC Therapeutics, a spinout from the UK's University of Leeds, raised $3.4 million that will support its research to develop novel anticoagulants that will decrease a person's risk for bleeding compared to those commercially available at present.

Full Story:
Labiotech (Germany)
More Summaries:
University of Leeds
11/19/2019

Researchers analyzed 461 children who were critically ill with sepsis and found that the PERSEVERE blood test, which uses five biomarkers, demonstrated high reliability in predicting which patients would develop severe sepsis. The findings, published in Science Translational Medicine, also found the test gave indications of the biological origins of the disease and mechanisms behind its progress, which could aid in the development of new treatments.

Full Story:
Medical News Today
11/19/2019

Laboratory staff at the Alberta Children's Hospital in Canada were able to reduce the number of unnecessary oral glucose tolerance tests by measuring patients' fasting plasma glucose levels via core laboratory chemistry analyzers, with pregnant patients undergoing a two-step screening process. This approach eliminates unnecessary OGTTs among patients who likely do not need them, leading to cost savings and reduced patient inconvenience and discomfort, said clinical chemist Lawrence de Koning.

11/15/2019

The HHS Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority will provide a $6 million grant to diagnostics firm Inflammatix to advance development of its HostDx system so that it can establish if a fever is caused by a bacterial or viral infection within 30 minutes. The aim is to help health care professionals make decisions about antibiotic prescribing.

11/14/2019

The authors of a case study published in Pediatrics say mandatory newborn genome sequencing programs are fraught with moral issues, including whether to inform parents of genetic mutations linked to adult-onset diseases and children's right to privacy. "Until sequencing is ready for prime time, the focus of pediatric sequencing should be exclusively on identifying diseases or conditions that can impact their present-day medical care," said co-author Lainie Friedman Ross.

Full Story:
Reuters
11/13/2019

A study presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology 2019 Congress revealed that a methylation-based assay developed by researchers from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute can detect more than 20 types of cancer, including lung, bladder and colorectal cancers, from blood samples. In tests of cell-free DNA from 3,583 blood samples, the assay had an overall specificity of 99.4% and a 76% sensitivity for aggressive cancers.

Full Story:
MDLinx
11/13/2019

NantHealth's Omics Core technology received marketing authorization from the FDA as a whole-exome tumor-normal in vitro diagnostic. The assay measures and reports overall tumor mutational burden in cancer tissue based on somatic mutations in 468 cancer-relevant genes.

Full Story:
Clinical OMICs
11/12/2019

Scientists from Yale have identified a strategy to prevent the spread of malaria in mosquitoes using CRISPR technology to reduce the gene expression of the protein called mosGILT, which boosts the mosquito's resistance to malaria and also disrupts its fertility. Findings from the study were reported in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.