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Top stories summarized by our editors
8/3/2020

Chef Pierre Thiam founded food brand Yolele to help boost the popularity of West African grain fonio in the US. Fonio is a drought-resistant heritage grain with a slightly nutty flavor that can be ground into gluten-free flour or substitute for just about any other grain in recipes.

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Forbes
8/3/2020

A new feature that will let users play back videos at different speeds is now part of Netflix's Android app. Variable-speed playback is popular with viewers but not as much with creators who don't want viewers skipping sections of videos.

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Variety online
8/3/2020

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said President Donald Trump will announce a new action "in the coming days" targeting Chinese software firms considered as threats to national security. Pompeo's comment follows Trump's announcement that he would ban Chinese-owned app TikTok in the US.

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CNBC
8/3/2020

Nathan's Hot Dogs has partnered with the ghost kitchen network Reef Kitchens to expand the classic hot dog brand's reach in New York City and enter the Miami, Los Angeles and Portland, Ore., markets. "We've been in talks with more restaurants recently that would previously have never considered going into a ghost-kitchen space or going into delivery, but right now they're just thinking about keeping their restaurant alive," said Reef Kitchens COO Carl Segal.

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Reef Kitchens
8/3/2020

The founders of TableTab designed their touchless ordering and payment app with efficiency in mind, but the pandemic has caused the duo to pivot their focus to the safety aspect of the technology. "The great thing about this product is that while it can have short-term benefit in creating a safe dining experience, it can also have the long-term benefit of creating high-margin experiences that restaurants can trust; that they can keep their margins high in these challenging times," co-founder Greg Kulchyckyj said.

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American Inno
8/3/2020

Pennsylvania-based company UBMe has developed an app called Curbside Communication that allows customers to directly message businesses when they are ready to receive a curbside pick-up order. The app, which lets diners order online but doesn't handle delivery, can also be used as a virtual waiting room for other services such as veterinary appointments and vaccinations.

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Curbside Communication, UBMe
7/31/2020

Zoom has fixed a security flaw that might have enabled unauthorized people to gain access to password-protected meetings. The vulnerability, recently described by the UK security researcher who uncovered it, allowed hackers to check an unlimited number of numerical passwords -- a tactic made possible by tools that can cycle through hundreds of thousands of combinations in minutes.

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Metro (UK)
7/31/2020

Amazon may have experienced a 40% jump in sales fueled by heightened demand during the pandemic, but it was ill-equipped to handle the high volume of orders, write Jay Greene and Abha Bhattarai. Staffing challenges, safety problems and the inability to live up to the Prime two-day shipping guarantee ultimately led customers to turn to competitors such Walmart and Target, where same-day pickups are offered.

7/31/2020

The 2020 AV/IT Summit will take place virtually next Thursday, Aug. 6. Registration is free for integrators, consultants, tech managers, and the like.

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AV Network
7/31/2020

Regular* readers will know that I moved house recently, and therefore I'm currently living in a world of boxes. I took a few days off to sort said boxes, and then… all of Garmin's systems went down, as a ransomware cyber attack took hold.

It wasn't just Strava-kudos-hungry runners and cyclists losing their mind - it was also pilots and sailors who were unable to access up-to-date maps and data. Not a good thing at all.

So I was glued to the news feeds, and trying to get in contact with Garmin (who couldn't email me as every system was down) to get an answer to the key, and still not fully answered, question: was any user data compromised?

The short version of what went down is: systems were locked by hackers, Garmin was being asked to pay, it had to shut down all systems to prevent further encryption, and eventually things started to get back to normal - check out our hub for the full story, which should serve as a warning for all big brands.

*Okay, only my mum knows.

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TechRadar

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