Enterprise IT
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/27/2020

Document technology provider Litera has acquired Best Authority, which Litera CEO Avaneesh Marwaha calls "a best of breed product" for generating legal brief tables of authorities. Developed by Levit & James, Best Authority claims more than 1,000 customers, including most of the largest law firms in the US.

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LawSites blog
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Avaneesh Marwaha
3/27/2020

Casetext, which last month launched a program for the automated writing of briefs, has secured an $8.2 million investment from groups that include an unidentified large law firm. Jake Heller, Casetext CEO, says the money will be used to hire more staff and enhance the features of the Compose tool to include more jurisdictions and information.

3/27/2020

Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati's tech arm, SixFifty, has a tool to help companies deal with employment policies in the era of COVID-19. It's one of several coronavirus-related legal tools offered by law firms, including Mayer Brown, where partner Elizabeth Espin Stern says, "We really have to be in the trenches with our clients helping them problem solve every second."

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Legaltech News
3/27/2020

The challenges presented by the coronavirus will test "human capital and tech" in a way that will drastically change the legal field, says Stuart Fuller, who leads the global legal services division of consulting/accounting giant KPMG. Fuller predicts that the "eco-legal system of business and legal" will be seen as more intertwined.

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Stuart Fuller
3/27/2020

The Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County, Texas, will outfit all 1,736 Houston-area buses and trains with Wi-Fi by mid-2021. The project's pilot was announced in December 2018, and 80% of users -- largely students -- said they were satisfied with the service.

3/27/2020

China has credited technology and strict laws with helping it stop the spread of the coronavirus. Disease tracking, autonomous delivery, geolocation, drone surveillance and other measures helped officials bring the outbreak under control in that country.

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Technology Networks
3/27/2020

China has been using aggressive measures to track coronavirus patients, and now it is using augmented reality glasses with built-in thermal imaging capabilities to screen body temperatures in crowds in Hangzhou in Zhejiang province. The glasses resemble sunglasses except for the heat-sensing camera, which can check hundreds of people's temperatures in minutes.

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Newsweek
3/26/2020

The huge increase in telecommuting over the past couple of weeks creates a perfect storm of cybersecurity risks, writes Patrick Hopkins, noting that most corporations aren't using zero-trust approaches or well-implemented policies on data access. On the employee side, even those who have been trained in security practices are likely to be frazzled while working long hours in a home environment with multiple distractions, and the VPN servers they're depending on could be vulnerable to hacking.

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SmartBrief/Technology
3/26/2020

Cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin are intertwined with ransomware attacks and are generally hackers' currency of choice, notes Sam Bocetta. He writes that the reason goes beyond the encryption and anonymity of cryptocurrencies: The transactions are easy to follow on the public exchanges, so hackers know when the ransom has been paid, but this same transparency makes cryptocurrency networks among the worst places to store money for the long term.

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Cointelegraph
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Sam Bocetta
3/26/2020

The World Health Organization is seeing an increase in attempted cyberattacks as it fights to contain the coronavirus pandemic, including one by hacker group DarkHotel that imitated a web page with the intention of stealing the passwords of WHO employees. Meanwhile, UK-based Hammersmith Medicines Research, a medical facility planning to test coronavirus vaccines, became the victim of a Maze ransomware attack but managed to restore its systems without paying ransom, although private records of over 2,300 patients -- including passports -- were leaked online.

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Healthcare IT News
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World Health Organization