Health care must-reads: What changes are on the horizon?

What’s next for health care? Based on last week’s most-read stories, what’s coming includes a focus on helping people live longer and the need to think about how AI can improve clinical care. A managed care company has found it can cut costs by helping some patients with housing, and a CEO write about the tension between care and capitalism.

Lengthening lives is next health care revolution, analysts say

Illumina, Alphabet and Novartis are leaders among companies developing innovations that could increase the quality and length of the human life span, a market that could be worth more than $600 billion annually by 2025, according to Bank of America analysts. They identified five trends in revolutionary health care: genomics, big data and artificial intelligence, future food, ammortality and moonshot medicine.

Full Story: CNBC

Housing program helps managed care company reduce costs

Cardinal Innovations Health said it reduced crisis service costs by 71% for members in its Transitions to Community Living program, which helps provide patients with mental health conditions access to safe, affordable housing. A team of clinicians, social workers and housing specialists works with the patients, and of the about 850 people moved from adult care facilities to independent housing, 72% did not have an emergency department visit or hospital admission in the past year.

Full Story: FierceHealthcare

Company finds niche helping startups access physicians

Enzyme Health found a niche helping digital health care startups, hospitals and health systems that are introducing telehealth services access board-certified physicians. Docity Health CEO James Cowan said the service saves his company money because Enzyme takes care of training, recruitment and credentialing.

Full Story: HealthLeaders Media

What will it take for AI to impact clinical care?

There are a few essential requirements that will accelerate AI-enabled strides in clinical care, starting with structured data. Conclusions drawn from well-conducted clinical trials may serve as a better foundation for machine learning than raw statistical inference.

Full Story: MedCity News

CEO: The tension between care and commerce in health care

Inequities in health care between the haves and have-nots -- for example, smaller rural hospitals that lack the negotiating power of large urban health systems -- are threats to care that can cost lives, writes Medsphere Systems CEO Irv Lichtenwald. "Our goals should have care as the preeminent value and commerce as a flexible, manageable, enabling operating system that uses ideas from a variety of perspectives," Lichtenwald writes.

Full Story: HIT Consultant

Tom Parks is a health editor at SmartBrief who focuses on health care, leadership and nursing as well as care at the beginning and end of life. He launched and edits the SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders newsletter.

____________________________________

This "most read" feature reflects the most read items in SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders from the previous week. Sign up for SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders to get news like this in your inbox, or check out all of SmartBrief’s health care newsletters, covering health IT, news for insurers, news for providers and more.