Health care must-reads: "Breaking glass" and other disruption in the news

Disruption continued to grab headlines last week, in the continued momentum toward home care and a call to action to “break some real glass” at the America’s Health Insurance Plans conference. However, one potential disrupter -- artificial intelligence -- continues to cause concern. Meanwhile, some things have not changed at all: Boston Children’s remains the nation’s top pediatric hospital, and former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb’s influence is intact after his departure from the agency.

Health care increasingly shifts from institutions to home

Health care's shift from institutional care to home care is accelerating and will even include higher-acuity patients, Advocate Aurora Health Chief Strategy Officer Scott Powder told the Health Care Innovation and Investment Conference. "If you've got a five- to seven-year outlook in terms of investment, that's a good place to be putting your money right now," Powder said.

Full Story: Skilled Nursing News

AI in health care: How long will it take to know it's safe?

Harvard professor of law Jonathan Zittrain likened the use of artificial intelligence in health care to asbestos, in that "it's all over the place, even though at no point did you explicitly install it, and it has possibly some latent bad effects that you might regret later, after it's already too hard to get it all out." Zittrain told a precision medicine conference that AI can be tricked into reaching false conclusions, and Kadija Ferryman of the Data & Society Research Institute said it is as likely to create bias as to eliminate it.

Full Story: STAT (tiered subscription model)

US health care system needs disrupting, leaders say

Health care leaders told the America's Health Insurance Plans' annual meeting that the US health care system needs disrupting, and Jefferson Health CEO Stephen Klasko said that will not happen unless there is a will to "break some real glass." Former Acting CMS Administrator Andy Slavitt said there must be less focus on revenue, and Highmark Executive VP Brian Setzer said health systems should focus on doing what they know best.

Full Story: Healthcare Dive

Report ranks Boston Children's as No. 1 pediatric hospital

Boston Children's Hospital was ranked No. 1 for the sixth year in a row on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals for 2019 to 2020. The report evaluated 125 facilities, 84 of which were ranked in the Top 50 for at least one specialty.

Full Story: WTOP-FM (Washington, D.C.)

Gottlieb tops most-influential in health care list

Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb was ranked No. 1 on Modern Healthcare's list of the 50 most-influential health care executives. NYU Langone Health CEO Robert Grossman was No. 2, and Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine CEO Mark Schuster was third.

Full Story: Modern Healthcare (tiered subscription model)

Melissa Turner is director of health care and life sciences content at SmartBrief. She edits science, medical and health care delivery newsletters and oversees development of content marketing pieces for SmartBrief’s health care clients.

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This "most read" feature reflects the most read items in SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders from the previous week. Sign up for SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders to get news like this in your inbox, or check out all of SmartBrief’s health care newsletters, covering health IT, news for insurers, news for providers and more.