Health care must-reads: Learning from casinos, biopharmas and women

Who can health care leaders learn from? In this week’s most-read stories from SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders, there were lessons from casinos (make patients feel like winners), biopharmas (smaller, emerging companies will be the source of innovation) and women (don’t ignore care for half of patients).

A lesson from casinos to make patient experience less of a gamble

The casino industry has lessons for health insurers when it comes to patient engagement and service, according to Harvard Business School professor Gary Loveman, who has experience in both worlds. Where casinos make every customer feel like a winner, health plans should work to ensure patients who need it receive positive reinforcement, because those who are disappointed with their care won't come back.

Full Story: MobiHealthNews

CEO: Emerging biopharma companies will lead disruption, transformation

The recent increase in drug pipeline approvals has been driven by emerging biopharma companies, which Cyclica CEO Naheed Kurji expects to spearhead innovation going forward, resulting in an industrywide disintegration, a new balance of power and more emphasis on personalized medicine. "I believe the pharmaceutical industry will reinvent itself and will play a significant role in improving the health of billions of people around the world," Kurji says.

Full Story: Forbes

How understanding women's health affects innovation

Failing to recognize that women's health includes the needs of women throughout their entire life cycle can limit innovation and create inequities for women, writes MedGyn Chief Operating Officer Aarathi Singh. Her recommendations to business leaders include having women's perspectives in advisory groups and focusing on specific issues instead of trying to solve everything.

Full Story: Forbes

Data silos slowing tech's entrance into health care

Technology companies find the lack of health data interoperability a barrier to advancing into the health care sector, said Blue Shield of California CEO Paul Markovich. Tech companies like Amazon and Google have trouble creating systems without access to clinical and billing data for their models.

Full Story: CNBC

How AI, new tech could change dental care

Artificial intelligence and technology advances have the potential to change how dentists provide care and the patient experience. Beam is basing dental insurance premiums on data from a toothbrush that records brushing activity, while Dentem used machine learning to develop a platform that automates tooth charting and plans to launch a virtual dental assistant that responds to voice commands.

Full Story: Forbes

Tom Parks is a health editor at SmartBrief who focuses on health care, leadership and nursing as well as care at the beginning and end of life. He launched and edits the SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders newsletter.

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This "most read" feature reflects the most read items in SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders from the previous week. Sign up for SmartBrief for Health Care Leaders to get news like this in your inbox, or check out all of SmartBrief’s health care newsletters, covering health IT, news for insurers, news for providers and more.