Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/19/2018

A state grant may be available for a breakwater erosion control project in Port Neches, Texas. The riverfront project, recently approved by the Army Corps of Engineers, calls for storm shutters and windows, new generators and an armory roof that can withstand 150 mph winds; it may cost between $725,000 and $850,000.

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Army Corps of Engineers
6/19/2018

The Mid-Reach portion of Florida's Brevard County Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction Project will be first to be built using a new $35 million federal grant. That segment will account for $28.4 million worth of beach protection and restoration work, with an additional $7 million to repair damage from Hurricane Irma.

6/19/2018

Virginia Beach will get about half of the $56 million in new federal funding for water infrastructure upgrades in communities in Hampton Roads and Richmond and on the state's Eastern Shore. The funding includes $10 million to restore wetlands and fish habitat, curb pollution and improve flood control in the Lynnhaven River Basin.

6/19/2018

Fifty-two acres of wetlands along Oregon's Walluski River would be targeted for restoration under a new provision in the federal Water Resources Development Act if passed by the Senate, as expected. The wetland restoration provision would also deauthorize parts of the Clatsop County Diking District No. 13 levee system, where erosion has been found to compromise dike conditions.

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Senate
6/19/2018

Green roofs are generally understood to be helpful in controlling stormwater runoff, but the roofs' substrates can differ. A UK study of six system configurations revealed few performance differences while finding that older substrates tend to have greater water-holding capacity and better ability to detain runoff.

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MDPI (Switzerland)
6/19/2018

Construction cranes may fail even when basic factors such as load and design life are well within prescribed limits. Such failures, which can be catastrophic, often may be traced to age, and that needn't be a mystery if "everyone in the chain of responsibility performs their role and understands that ... the modern finely engineered crane does not necessarily last for ever," writes Ben Dobbs, technical manager at the Lifting Equipment Engineers Association.

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IMPO magazine
6/19/2018

Mountains of toxic sludge are one horrid byproduct of China's rapid industrialization, but a solution may be at hand with a process that not only decontaminates the stuff but also turns it into chemicals and the valuable gases hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The process developed by Innov8tia Environmental Engineering is a variation on pyrolysis that also produces more energy than it consumes.

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ASME
6/19/2018

A new type of microscope that incorporates lattice light-sheet microscopy and technology used by astronomers to filter atmospheric distortions is giving researchers their first 3D color movies of subcellular activity. The groundbreaking device is the work of Eric Betzig, a self-described engineer who also is a physicist and recipient of a Nobel Prize in chemistry.

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Eric Betzig
6/19/2018

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has extracted 5 grams of powdered uranium, or yellowcake, from ordinary seawater using acrylic fibers that are inexpensive and reusable. The breakthrough, achieved in association with LCW Supercritical Technologies, eventually could create unlimited access to uranium for nuclear energy.

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New Atlas
6/18/2018

Apple is helping protect iOS 12 users with a feature that gives emergency responders access to the user's location data when they call 911 thanks to RapidSOS technology. The feature complies with the Federal Communications Commission's requirement that smartphone devices have the ability to locate emergency callers to within 50 meters at least 80% of the time by 2021.

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9to5Mac