Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/17/2018

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, who died Monday, invested in an eclectic mix of startups, owned sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and Portland Trail Blazers, and supported a myriad of causes after leaving Microsoft in 1983, writes Harry McCracken. "He didn't have a second act after Microsoft; he had dozens of them, and that relentless quest adds up to a sizable chunk of his legacy," writes McCracken.

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Fast Company online
10/17/2018

In-N-Out Burger has stayed true to its minimalist menu, gradual pace of expansion and family-run corporate structure, with the founders' granddaughter as president and every store owned by the company. That in-house mentality extends to each location, as the average In-N-Out manager has more than 15 years' experience, a six-figure salary and part of the profits.

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Forbes
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In-N-Out, burger
10/17/2018

Carving out more family time is possible if you're able to streamline work goals and stick to a schedule, writes James Sudakow, who spent a year setting boundaries between work and home, as well as talking with other fathers about the issue. "With no guilt, I was able to set better boundaries around work, which ultimately made me more focused, efficient and effective," he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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James Sudakow
10/17/2018

Anthony Levandowski was known as a relentless innovator and entrepreneur who advanced Google's autonomous-car efforts before leaving for Uber and embroiling the companies in a trade-secrets lawsuit, as well as an arbitration case against Levandowski. The larger effect, Charles Duhigg writes, could be a chilling effect on the ability of tech employees to leave and take their knowledge elsewhere -- reversing the longstanding job-hopping culture that helped make Silicon Valley what it is today.

10/17/2018

Make a positive impression during your first meeting with your team by focusing on getting to know people instead of diving into work, writes Claire Lew, CEO of Know Your Company. When this approach incorporates meaningful questions about team dynamics and individual concerns, you'll build trust, relationships and a collaborative spirit, she writes.

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Claire Lew
10/17/2018

Ideal customer service, though rare, should empathize with the customer, seek to solve the problem and learn from it, writes Seth Godin. "Instead, the on-hold industrial complex has created an endless maze, designed to sort through the slightly-annoyed and only serve the remaining truly-committed to getting to the bottom of it," he writes.

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Seth Godin's Blog
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Seth Godin
10/17/2018

A quick search on eBay finds many items with paranormal histories available, although actual spook factor is not guaranteed, writes Reyhan Harmanci, who amassed a collection from the site, including a haunted doll, china set, watch and a teddy bear that allegedly induces nightmares.

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eBay
10/17/2018

The acts of a third-party hacker, not the data security practices of a hotel subsidiary company, led to a data breach and therefore didn't trigger personal injury coverage under the parent company's liability policy, a Florida federal judge ruled recently.

10/17/2018

In this four-part series, some of Pizza Hut's top female leaders discuss their backgrounds, advice for others and experiences at the company. "What I have found in this culture are women and men who help each other and cheer each other on," said Zipporah Allen, the company's chief marketing officer.

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Forbes, Forbes, Forbes, Forbes
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Pizza Hut, Pizza Hut
10/17/2018

Building an effective corporate culture is a challenging task that is "the leadership equivalent of an extreme sport," writes Cheryl Bachelder, former CEO of Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen. Cultural development cannot be hurried, and it requires monetary investment from leadership, she writes.