Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/15/2018

Sears Chairman Edward Lampert's track record running Sears, which filed for bankruptcy today, has been one of creative financial juggling that might have done more to protect his interests than help Sears adapt and compete, argues a Bloomberg analysis. "He closed stores, fired employees and, in what will surely be long remembered as the most unseemly element of the saga, carved out some choice assets for himself," write Katherine Burton, Lauren Coleman-Lochner and Eliza Ronalds-Hannon.

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Sears, Edward Lampert, Bloomberg
10/15/2018

Adidas isn't concerned about its relationship with endorser and designer Kanye West because the company's success depends upon dozens of markets around the world, each of which has its own standards, says Adidas CEO Kasper Rorsted. "Who is actually measuring the level of appropriateness that the company is being judged upon?" he asks.

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Business Insider
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Adidas, Kanye West, Kasper Rorsted
10/15/2018

Shonda Rhimes, executive producer of TV shows such as "Grey's Anatomy," "Scandal" and "Black-ish," talks about diversity in television and why she left ABC for Netflix. "I wanted to be able to decide what kind of shows we were going to make and how we were going to make them," she says.

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Elle magazine
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Shonda Rhimes, Netflix, ABC
10/15/2018

Leaders exhibit a high emotional intelligence when they're alert to other people's feelings, show compassion and don't succumb to defensiveness when challenged, writes John R. Stoker. "Instead, they seek to understand the source of others' feelings and the values that are important to others," he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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John R. Stoker
10/15/2018

High-functioning teams are led by people who exhibit humility, respect and concern for others while being open about their vulnerabilities, writes John Keyser. "If we think we are too busy to have these conversations and to take the time to listen, well, we must realize that we must make the time," he argues.

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John Keyser
10/15/2018

Breaking habits is easier when the temptation is automated away, whether through technology or through simple steps such as taking screens out of the bedroom so that you sleep better, writes James Clear in this book excerpt. "When the effort required to act on your desires becomes effectively zero, you can find yourself slipping into whatever impulse arises at the moment," he writes.

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James Clear blog
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James Clear
10/15/2018

Chicago relied on feats of engineering to emerge as a transportation and manufacturing hub, leveraging its location as a way to Canada to the Gulf of Mexico and the East to the West, writes Joshua Salzmann. "Between the 1830s and 1900, lawmakers, engineers, and thousands of long-forgotten laborers created a new, manmade geography for Chicago -- building a canal and sewers, raising city streets, and even reversing a river," he writes.

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Zocalo Public Square
10/12/2018

Inventory runs, like bank runs, are a natural reaction to dwindling stock that adds volatility and discomfort to the supplier, and a study suggests one way to fix this is by not revealing inventory data to retailers. "I think this might be the very first paper that comes up with a cost for showing information in the supply chain," says Robert Bray, associate professor of operations at Kellogg.

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Kellogg Insight
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Robert Bray, Kellogg
10/12/2018

The concept of agile thinking can improve how we develop employees and our own careers, as we need to be flexible about our goals and nimble enough to learn new skills as the job market changes, writes Julie Winkle Giulioni. "Consider job shadowing, coaching, mentoring, opportunities for greater visibility, experience-based learning via special projects and stretch assignments," she writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Julie Winkle Giulioni
10/12/2018

Part of leadership is enabling others to carry on for you after you're gone, writes Ken Downer. Training with succession in mind also creates accountability, empowers people to make decisions and gives you time back in your day, he writes.

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Ken Downer