Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/22/2019

Empathy can help a leader understand what motivates, inspires and causes stress for employees and, therefore, how to delegate and achieve the best outcome, writes Joel Garfinkle. "Time spent with your team will give you an idea about how each of them approaches the world," he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
1/22/2019

An uncertain environment is one that doesn't allow for predictions, even statistical ones, leaving organizations only able to take concrete actions they have control over, writes University of Amsterdam Business School professor Jeroen Kraaijenbrink. "To some extent, confidence can be achieved by gathering detailed and relevant data," he writes.

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Forbes, Forbes
1/22/2019

Social responsibility by CEOs and businesses is a priority for employees and consumers, according to studies done by Deloitte and Edelman. The 2019 Edelman Trust Barometer found that 76% of respondents want CEOs to act on key issues rather than wait for regulation, while 40% of respondents to the Deloitte Millennial Survey 2018 said companies need to "improve society."

1/22/2019

Some cultures follow stricter social norms than others, and there's usually a logic to either path based on the threats facing that society, says psychology professor Michele Gelfand, who has researched what she calls "tight" and "loose" cultures. "The gist is this: When people perceive threat -- whether real or imagined, they want strong rules and autocratic leaders to help them survive," she says.

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Behavioral Scientist
1/22/2019

Business innovation has long been about incremental growth, and getting past that restraint starts with better narratives about the organization's future, write INSEAD professor Nathan Furr, Uncommon Partners CEO Kyle Nel and Neurons CEO Thomas Zoega Ramsey. After creating a narrative, companies can then break through "decision bottlenecks" and deploy applied neuroscience to create better key performance indicators.

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INSEAD Knowledge
1/22/2019

Author and artist Austin Kleon presents the question, "What happens to the good teachings of men when those men do bad things?" specifically in reference to lessons he learned from the actor Jeffrey Tambor before he was mired in scandal. Kleon argues that he now owns the lessons Tambor taught, and he can also "keep looking for and learning from better men, or better yet, better women."

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Austin Kleon blog
1/22/2019

News Atlas' annual list of the most expensive sales of scientific documents and instruments was expanded to artifacts, with a copy of "The Birds of America" by John James Audubon topping the list after selling for $9.65 million in June.

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New Atlas
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John James Audubon
1/22/2019

Communication in business is inherently difficult, but Art Petty offers five tactics to have conversations that show your investment and credibility. "Listen hard, engage with genuine curiosity and pile on the respect and a desire to make their situation better and you'll be amazed how easily doors to progress open for you at work," he writes.

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Art Petty
1/22/2019

During 2018, the world's foreign direct investment -- which includes mergers and acquisitions, investment in new projects in foreign markets, and intracompany loans -- fell by 19% to $1.2 trillion, largely due to changes in US tax laws, the UN development agency said. It was the lowest net global FDI figure since 2009.

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Reuters
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UN, United Nations
1/22/2019

France's privacy regulator fined Google €50 million, or nearly $57 million, for violating the EU's General Data Protection Regulation by failing to clearly inform users how it was handling their data. The maximum fine the regulator could have imposed is about $4.3 billion.