Industry News
Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/9/2021

A mint condition copy of "Action Comics #1" that introduced Superman in 1938 has been sold for the second time in three years, this time for $3.25 million. The comic book's latest sales fetched a $1 million profit for the seller.

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CNN
4/9/2021

Consumers are buying fewer extravagant goods than they used to, but makers of high-end jewelry, handbags and other products may still succeed if they align with the "minimalist luxury" movement that deemphasizes quantity and prioritizes quality, say Z. John Zhang, Pinar Yildirim and Z. Jessie Liu. Manufacturers of luxury products "should think about [their] product portfolio, trying to perhaps narrow it down to the core products, and think about ... pricing that is in line with consumers' desires to signal their status or their wealth," they say.

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Knowledge@Wharton
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Z. John Zhang, Pinar Yildirim
4/9/2021

Why it matters: Strap on your moon boots because this is a fun article to start your weekend. The team at LiveScience offers up this in-depth look at what it would take to walk around that big chunk of cheese in the sky. They even plan a route and everything!

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LiveScience
4/9/2021

This is one of mine from the pre-COVID travel days.

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Flickr
4/9/2021

Engagement and connection will remain important even as more people return to offices, and leaders will need to listen for signs of what people need and what ideas they've brought with them, writes Julie Winkle Giulioni. "Guiding people through this uncharted terrain into a future characterized by even greater cohesion, relationships and commitment is possible," she writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
4/9/2021

Old habits are broken and new habits formed when people set intentions, write them down and start formulating actions to implement those desires, writes performance coach Zack Blakeney. Write out sticky notes outlining a new habit, he writes, and put them in places that tempt you, such as the pantry door that contains the junk food.

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Thrive Global
4/9/2021

"Star Trek" made lore of Capt. James T. Kirk defeating the seemingly impossible Kobayashi Maru challenge by inventing a third option instead of accepting two awful choices, writes Steve Keating. Leaders can emulate Kirk by thinking creatively and "breaking a rule or two that apparently didn't need to be a rule to begin with," he writes.

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LeadToday
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Steve Keating
4/9/2021

Boards make better decisions when they can have a good debate, have multiple sources of information and are not afraid to hear bad news, according to research. "For their part, boards can fall into the trap of asking a few tough questions but then effectively rubber-stamping the decision the management wants no matter what," says Aaron De Smet of McKinsey.

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McKinsey
4/9/2021

Empathy is an important part of leadership, but sometimes you must directly challenge someone to improve even as you continue supporting them, writes Dana Theus. "Coaching feedback doesn't tell someone how to do something, but creates a safe space within which they can try, fail and succeed to figure it out themselves," she writes.

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Inpower Coaching
4/9/2021

Virtual meetings can be challenging because every participant has a different set of preferences and expectations, although some mitigating tactics include surveys, breakout rooms, asynchronous communication and meeting-free time blocks, write University of North Carolina at Charlotte researchers. "While navigating a paradox of sometimes contradictory preferences, leaders can still make a difference," they write.