Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/18/2019

The Boeing 737 Max is under scrutiny for reasons including the US government's deference in certifying the aircraft, whether pilots have received enough training and even the possibility that the 737's original design has become a liability. While 737 pilot and American Airlines pilot union official Michael Michaelis defended the plane's overall safety record, "I would like to see the fix done and have a full briefing from the manufacturer about what this thing is really going to do and how it's going to do it."

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Boeing, American Airlines, MAX
3/18/2019

Gratitude recognizes "that you have something to offer the world and the world has something to offer you," says John Baldoni in this blog post and video. This emotion can be lived internally as well as in how we demonstrate appreciation to others.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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John Baldoni
3/18/2019

Executives can't share everything with subordinates, but without enough connection outside of work they risk becoming isolated, depressed and prone to destructive behaviors, writes INSEAD professor Manfred Kets de Vries. "If life consists of only work and no play, executives are at risk of losing their sense of balance," he writes.

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INSEAD Knowledge
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Manfred Kets de Vries
3/18/2019

People who consider themselves servant-leaders will help teams feel supported by asking for creative solutions and making room for them to emerge as leaders themselves, writes Keith Corbin. "Servant-leadership is not about taking the easy way, it is about bettering those around you and helping them grow," he writes.

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Keith Corbin
3/18/2019

Creating a workplace where employees feel safe being themselves isn't easy, but doing so can improve team performance and job satisfaction, writes Benjamin Crudo, the founder and CEO of Diff. "Today, people crave a work environment that reflects their passion and values -- and allows them to express who they really are," he argues.

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Fast Company online
3/18/2019

The Keaton Music Typewriter improved the musical composition process through a semi-circular keyboard designed to print notes on staff-lined paper. The typewriters, largely produced in the 1950s, are collectibles today.

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My Modern Metropolis
3/18/2019

When distractions take away an audience's attention, acknowledge the interruption -- even joke about it if possible -- rather than pretend nothing is happening, writes Ashish Arora, a co-founder of SketchBubble.com. Another good way to handle an interruption is to have a story ready should you need to burn a few minutes.

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Ragan
3/18/2019

Use your perfectionist tendencies in a healthy way by focusing on the most important competencies, delegating other tasks and understanding the "why" behind your drive to excel, writes LaRae Quy. "Once you understand your motivation, you can choose how to respond to a situation rather than let your emotions react in ways that can sabotage you," she writes.

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LaRae Quy blog
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LaRae Quy
3/18/2019

Why it matters: In preparation for the launch of its own beefed-up video streaming service, Apple unveiled a new iPad and updated its iPad Mini to optimize them for video.

With its sights set on the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime Video, Apple has been hard at work creating its own library of original content. The effort has also been so secretive that some of the content creators don't yet know when their shows will hit those new Apple screens.

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Reuters
3/18/2019

Why it matters: The cost of college has sky-rocketed in the US in recent years and unlimited borrowing by students likely played a role in that increase. The theory behind this proposal is that a cap on how much students can borrow from the federal government will decrease the overall number of funds available and college costs will level off - or maybe even (gasp!) decrease. What do you think?

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The Associated Press