Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/13/2018

Why it matters: Apparently, young Americans are having less sex than previous generations and that is both completely understandable and not very surprising. It's expensive to go on dates (while paying off student loans) and a lot of folks live in unamorous housing situations, like with parents or numerous room mates.

On the other hand: One would imagine that someone with time to answer extensive surveys is the sort of person who isn't having sex. Skewed survey?

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The Atlantic online
11/13/2018

Videoconferencing limits our ability to read others' emotions and transition smoothly between speakers, so appoint a moderator who clarifies each person's role and assures the conversation stays on track, writes Nick Morgan. "For many occasional users of video, the experience is unsettling enough that it may inhibit [participants'] usual tendencies to voice disagreements, volunteer for further work or otherwise participate," he writes.

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Public Words, Public Words
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Nick Morgan
11/13/2018

Learning to lead well requires a combination of "learning and doing," writes Wally Bock. Accept that mistakes are a part of growth and commit to the work that gets less fanfare, such as working side-by-side with teams to model the behavior and performance you expect, he writes.

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Three Star Leadership
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Wally Bock
11/13/2018

The ability to inspire others, communicate openly and model company values are the top three traits millennials, responding to a survey, said they desire in leaders, writes Debra Corey. Responses to the survey indicated a shift from a control-based approach to a coaching orientation, she writes.

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ThoughtLeaders
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Debra Corey
11/13/2018

Best practices limit organizational innovation potential, so encourage your team to test new ideas rather than depending on old successes, say Geoff Tuff and Steven Goldbach. "If companies understood that they have to literally start from zero every year and earn [revenue], they would be less susceptible to disruptive forces," says Goldbach.

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Knowledge@Wharton
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Steven Goldbach, Geoff Tuff
11/13/2018

Teams that communicated with each other intermittently, rather than constantly or not at all, produced the highest-quality and most varied solutions, found a study of work collaboration. The study's findings serve as a cautionary tale for workplaces that use technology to keep teams constantly connected, writes Roberta Holland.

11/13/2018

Persistence allowed many people to push through setbacks on their way to revolutionary artistic and business success, writes John Bessant. Research has found this dogged determination creates a "cognitive flexibility" that allows the mind to follow new directions toward solutions, resulting in more creative ideas, he writes.

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Innovation Excellence
11/13/2018

Daniel Schwartz was 32 when he became Burger King's CEO, so he knows the value of tapping young people for leadership. "You need to be able to live meritocracy, and living meritocracy is giving people a chance who perform well," says Schwartz, now CEO of Restaurant Brands International, which owns Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen and Tim Hortons, in addition to Burger King.

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Business Insider
11/13/2018

MRI scans of beatboxers in action reveal the acrobatics their vocal tracts achieve to create sounds unheard in any language, according to researchers. The research may help those who teach this art form and speech therapists who are trying to help patients attain more vocal control.

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Newsweek
11/13/2018

As the global construction robotics market continues to expand, several robots have been making a difference at job sites, including the semi-automated mason, tybot and Doxel. More robots are in prototype development, like the BrickBot, humanoid bot and SpotMini robot dog.

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Construction Dive