Industry News
Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/13/2020

New York Times CEO Mark Thompson will retire next month after leading the company's successful digital subscription drive, and he credits structural and culture changes in product development. "We moved to a matrix structure where the team leaders -- often very young, late 20s, early 30s -- have power over the product and tech road maps and can make decisions based on what they learn from the testing-and-learning platforms, without regard to senior leadership," says Thompson.

Full Story:
McKinsey
8/13/2020

Tennis has long had an expectation that crowds will be quiet and orderly, dating back several hundred years to the emergence of court tennis, a peculiar sport popular with aristocrats and royalty such as England's Henry VIII, writes Dan Nosowitz. Crowd noise won't be a problem at this year's US Open, which will go on without spectators just as baseball, basketball and other sports have done.

Full Story:
Atlas Obscura
More Summaries:
tennis
8/13/2020

Why it matters: Yesterday's WYWW mentioned how a legal dispute centered on how Uber and Lyft classify their workers might see the two companies cease operations in California until the case works its way through the appeals system -- a process that could take months.

Now, the district attorney in San Francisco has drawn food delivery giant DoorDash into a similar legal fracas. To steal a phrase from the world of chess, this seems like a situation where the State of California and the SF district attorney might not be looking at the whole board.

DoorDash (and Uber Eats) have helped keep restaurants in business and become a key part in the food supply chain for many people during the pandemic. If California finds itself having to go back into a full lockdown due to the pandemic, do authorities really want people to be without the services of Uber Eats and DoorDash?

The merits of reclassifying workers and other aspects of these cases are absolutely worth debating (and enforcing if that is the outcome of the appeals), but the timing of these legal escalations could prove painfully foolish.

8/13/2020

This photo was submitted by Erin Kaese, who writes: "The image of the bee reminded me of a photo I took yesterday during my neighborhood walk. Someone decorated the "stuff" coming out of the tree. Not even sure what that is! Sap? Clever though ... Love my neighborhood! No filter."

Any WYWWers know what that "stuff" is?

Full Story:
Flickr
More Summaries:
SAP
8/13/2020

The pandemic has highlighted the deficiencies of companies' mentoring programs for women, and such initiatives have become increasingly important as the pandemic takes a disproportionate toll on women. Programs "shouldn't just be about having a checkbox for anyone who wants to participate, but rather much more focused mentoring, messaging and resources for different groups of women who face different types of challenges in the workplace," says Chronus CEO Seena Mortazavi.

8/13/2020

Managing individual and organizational energy levels can be made easier when you have a framework, such as a four-square quadrant for organizational states supplied by Joseph Harder of the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business. He offers questions and exercises for leaders to identify energy levels and start improving them.

More Summaries:
University of Virginia
8/13/2020

Any reductions in marketing spend during difficult times should be considered on a case-by-case basis, with a focus on reducing areas with the worst return on investment, writes Nicholas Watkis, founder of Contract Marketing Service. "Consideration must be given to the relative importance of particular customer segments, product groups, and geographic areas, in producing income," he writes.

Full Story:
CustomerThink
8/13/2020

Video-based meetings and presentations require extra care in body language, listening and how you engage with other participants, writes Judith Humphrey. "Show that you have not only heard what your audience has said, but that you feel what they feel," she writes.

Full Story:
Fast Company online
8/13/2020

The coronavirus pandemic has changed consumer behaviors, with less spending on luxuries and dining out and more time spent on home-based activities, including streaming, writes Frank Trentmann of the Center for Consumer Society Research. "The notions that each person should have their own home, eat out, fly to Ibiza, exercise, take at least one hot shower a day, and change their clothes constantly -- these are not inborn human rights, and were indeed regarded as exceptional before they established themselves as normal," he writes.

8/13/2020

US District Judge Stephen Bough has held that a group of restaurants and hair salons can move forward with litigation over denied business interruption insurance claims stemming from the coronavirus pandemic. Bough said the businesses' argument that the virus caused a direct physical loss is plausible, and the plaintiffs' lawyer Brandon Boulware said Cincinnati Insurance did not exclude such losses in the businesses' business interruption policies.

Full Story:
Reuters, Reuters
More Summaries:
Cincinnati Insurance