Leadership
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1/24/2020

Why it matters: If you can see past what appears to be a blood war brewing between mathematicians and traffic engineers, this article about what it takes to fix traffic offers some interesting ideas. One surprise is the call for all drivers to be on the same navigation system.

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Fast Company online
1/24/2020

Why it matters: Researchers have put together a real-time map of reported cases of coronavirus around the world. The CDC confirmed a second case in the US and continued to monitor 63 other "patients under investigation." Hundreds of cases have been reported around the world and China has placed travel restrictions on about 30 million people to try to contain the outbreak.

1/24/2020

This photo was taken by Daniel Jones and submitted by Jim Crutcher.

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Daniel Jones
1/24/2020

Why it matters: I've spent all week with one eye on the events taking place in Davos; paying particular attention to the way the big bank were roughed up a bit for the role they continue to play in financing fossil fuel projects. Thanks to a report from Greenpeace, Standard Chartered was lumped in with 23 other financial services firms and accused of being hypocritical about its efforts to reduce CO2 emissions. But a closer look made me wonder if Greenpeace should be lauding Standard Chartered instead of criticizing it?

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SmartBrief/Finance
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Standard Chartered
1/24/2020

The best leaders invest time in their people to help them grow instead of simply "spending time" to correct mistakes, writes Steve Keating. This is an example of managing versus leading, he argues, wherein leaders look to grow people rather than oversee and correct them.

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LeadToday
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Steve Keating
1/24/2020

Employees do their best work when they feel like leaders care about and "also bear a responsibility to them," writes Thane Bellomo. "As a leader, you are uniquely positioned to improve the lives of those with whom you work, even as you successfully achieve business milestones," he writes.

1/24/2020

Corporate innovation requires a variety of talent profiles and roles, with people able to generate and manage opportunities, handle new business and dive deep into functional problems, according to research and a book by Babson College professors Gina O'Connor and Andrew Corbett. Sitting above all this should be a council "of senior leaders responsible for governing the strategic innovation function and advancing new businesses that will ensure the company has a promising future," writes Karl Klaussen.

1/24/2020

When you take on a new report, bring them into the process for one-on-one meetings, including getting their help with the agenda and following up with suggestions on how to improve such conversations, writes Claire Lew. "Recall that the purpose of your one-on-one meeting is to uncover potential issues and concerns, so your questions should be targeted around this," she writes.

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Know Your Team
1/24/2020

A survey by Cigna suggests that almost two-thirds of new hires feel isolated at work, and a majority of senior leaders say they feel alone at work. "If we think about the way to mitigate this -- which is having coffee, having lunch with your co-workers -- that's not a typical workplace culture for a lot of senior executives," says Cigna Chief Medical Officer Douglas Nemecek.

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CNBC
1/24/2020

Procrastination could be more about how we feel about the tasks we're putting off and not a failure to manage our time, some researchers have argued. Going on YouTube to watch a cat video, for instance, only delays anxiety, and Tim Pychyl at Carleton University recommends that the best action is to get started with something, even simple tasks.

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BBC
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