Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/20/2020

Identity theft has been a problem for years, and credit report changes, such as unfamiliar charges and accounts, can be a sign of trouble. Other signs include rejected or unexpected medical claims and refused personal checks.

2/20/2020

Police say impostor scams, which cost victims $667 million last year, are the top fraud they're informed of. In one case, an 80-year-old Oregon widower lost $200,000 when a scammer stole a Florida woman's identity, befriended the man and convinced him to invest in what the scammer claimed was a business.

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Seaside Signal (Ore.)
2/20/2020

You're ready for leadership if you're comfortable confronting people about their performance, are decisive and want to help people succeed, writes Wally Bock. Try out a leadership role on a project or at a nonprofit before committing to a full-time role.

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Lead Change
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Wally Bock
2/20/2020

CEOs must use collaboration and alliances in pursuit of sustainability because no company can do much on its own, says Lorna Davis, a former senior adviser to Danone. "This is important because the old way for CEOs was that they tackled only goals that they could control: 'my people, my factories, plastic containers' and so on," Davis says.

2/20/2020

The US auto industry will have to rethink its supply chain strategies in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak and consider moves such as diversifying suppliers and keeping extra inventory on hand. Llamasoft CEO Razat Gaurav says the crisis means automakers should "consider tradeoffs between operating on that lean principle and carrying some of that buffer inventory you need during unfortunate situations like this."

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Forbes
2/20/2020

Using "hedging" phrases in your conversations, such as "it would be great if" or "basically," can undermine your point, writes Amy Boone. "Hedging doesn't just make us sound uncertain, it sounds like we are trying to sugarcoat, distort, or hide something at times," Boone writes.

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The Ethos3 Blog
2/20/2020

Generalists will remain coveted in the workforce "where situations and models change frequently and without a pattern, where data is messy or missing, where a fast but 'good enough' answer will suffice, or where tasks are frequently changing and don't allow time for re-purposing or retooling," writes Jeffrey Phillips. Having "really deep but narrow knowledge" could be a detriment if machine learning can be applied to the problem.

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Innovate on Purpose
2/20/2020

Alisha Valavanis, CEO and general manager of Force 10 Sports Management and the Seattle Storm WNBA team, says her parents taught her the importance of communication and collaboration for team success. "Once I stepped on the court, it was very clear to me what you can achieve as a team, and that there is nothing better than winning together," she says.

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Profile magazine
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WNBA
2/20/2020

A Walmart employee named Charlene has become an internet sensation for photos on a regional Walmart Facebook page that show her with a milk mustache announcing a milk price cut and modeling workout equipment. The employee has appeared on ABC's "Good Morning America."

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Walmart, Charlene
2/20/2020

Why it matters: This matters because it is simply incredible!

When I first heard about this, I guessed the patient played the violin during her surgery so she could remain calm and keep her mind off of what was going on in her mind. But that was not the case. Doctors woke Dagmar Turner mid-surgery and had her start playing so her music would serve as a real-time gauge of their work as they aimed to avoid damaging the parts of her brain that enable her to play.

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National Public Radio