Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/9/2020

Why it matters: Amsterdam is a place where people like to experiment with things (so I'm told), so it makes sense policymakers in the city are going to try a different approach when it comes to responding to the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Many leaders around the world are scrambling to get back to the way things were before the crisis struck, but what if things weren't all that ideal before the crisis struck? Shouldn't an effort be made to rebuild things in a way that makes them better? That's what leaders in Amsterdam are doing by embracing "The Doughnut Model" as a guide for their future.

Policymakers near and far will be watching Amsterdam to see how the plan fares and it is certain to be controversial. Another thing that is certain is that some naysayer will fancy themselves quite hip and witty when they attempt to re-brand the model as "The Voodoo Doughnut Model."

4/9/2020

The Loyola Ramblers' run to the 2018 men's basketball Final Four -- and their spirited good-luck charm, Sister Jean -- are sure to be recalled fondly by college basketball fans. But a Ramblers victory in the NCAA tournament 55 years prior changed the college basketball landscape forever. WYWW reader Bill Pyrek reminds us why that game in 1963 was so important.

-- Doug Harris

4/9/2020

Spanx CEO Sara Blakely will donate $5,000 apiece to 1,000 female entrepreneurs to help them weather the coronavirus pandemic, noting that she founded her company two decades ago with just $5,000. Blakely is also working with the Center for Civic Innovation in Atlanta to provide meals for food-insecure families and health care workers, and has offered to loan her wedding dress to brides whose weddings have been delayed by the outbreak.

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Sara Blakely, Spanx
4/9/2020

Naphtali Hoff wraps up his five-step guide to improved productivity by urging leaders to help their teams manage stress levels and to adapt their leadership approach to each person's preferred style, among other advice. "Leaders can also help by pitching in, offering people opportunities to delegate, accepting excellent even if imperfect work and giving people opportunity to vent and offer constructive feedback to improve processes and systems," he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
4/9/2020

A mindset of taking action is usually the right approach, writes retired Gen. Peter van Uhm, provided you lean on your team to give you intelligence you wouldn't otherwise access. "Understand that afterward, when you are held accountable for what you did, it's easier to explain why you took action than why you did nothing," he writes.

4/9/2020

Long-term decision-making can suffer when people are carrying around stress or believe they will be penalized for mistakes, according to a Stanford University study of volunteers using a virtual reality tool. "The results showed that those who were not threatened with punishment were able to find more novel shortcuts on their journey, with those in the stress-induced group tending to fall back on tried and tested routes," writes Adi Gaskell.

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The Horizons Tracker
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Stanford University
4/9/2020

Scenario planning can help companies see how a crisis will affect cash flow in the next 90 days or less, writes Anne Petrik. She outlines a four-step method that includes setting priorities, objectives and key results.

4/9/2020

Virtual teams can benefit from an agile approach that starts with creating clear goals, being able to adapt to changing conditions and practicing ongoing feedback, says Nahia Orduna of Vodafone, who leads a remote-based agile-focused team. She discusses how agile teams operate in sprints, the importance of etiquette for video calls and how her team gathers for lunch even when they can't be in the same room.

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Forbes
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Vodafone
4/9/2020

Nearly three-quarters of chief financial officers will continue remote working for at least formerly on-site employees after the coronavirus pandemic ends, according to a Gartner survey. Smaller percentages of CFOs plan to reduce on-site spending for technology and real estate.

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ZDNet
4/9/2020

Conductor CEO Seth Besmertnik has dealt with selling his company and buying it back in recent years and says he remains grateful rather than focused on how he might have been victimized. "It's also important, as a leader, to remember that everyone is dealing with a lot right now, so focus on the human first and show that you care," he says.

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LinkedIn
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CEO Seth Besmertnik