Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/24/2019

When designing a Power Point presentation, identify the one big idea you want to convey, then arrange the data to tell an insightful and beautiful story, writes Kory Grushka. "A presentation is not a series of disconnected ideas or data points, but the ultimate form of multimedia storytelling," he suggests.

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SmartBrief/Marketing
5/24/2019

Leaders can improve relationships by understanding their personal value and finding ways to show others they are valued, writes John Maxwell. "You invite people into relationship when you as a leader regularly serve others, are quick with a kind word, and are first to encourage someone," he writes.

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John Maxwell blog
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John Maxwell
5/24/2019

To have deeper conversations, pay attention to the body language of the other person -- the "silent movie" in front of you -- writes Ed Batista. "The challenge is having the mental capacity to track these 'tests' and learn from them over time while maintaining interpersonal contact," he writes.

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Ed Batista
5/24/2019

Net Promoter Score doesn't properly measure employee satisfaction in line with customer experience and it doesn't stand up to today's data-heavy, real-time tracking realities, writes Matt Egol. Ron Shevlin concurs, arguing that better tools exist to measure behavior rather than intentions.

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Ron Shevlin, Matt Egol
5/24/2019

Sleeping well and otherwise being productive can be a challenge for people like Alex Wilhelm, who splits his work and life between San Francisco and Rhode Island. He offers suggestions on how to manage, including cutting off caffeine at 2 p.m., sticking to water at night, using white noise and going to bed at the locally correct time.

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Substack
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Alex Wilhelm, caffeine
5/24/2019

Actor, writer and director Amy Poehler creates a collaborative and meaningful working environment by hiring professionals who work well with others and know their limits. "I like self-care -- people who know what their worth is and what they can do or can't do well, and won't let themselves be pushed in ways that are not appropriate for them," she says.

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Amy Poehler
5/24/2019

New York City's Riverside Park Conservancy is importing goats from the northern part of the state to spend their summer grazing on invasive plants. The city's nickname of "Gotham" has its roots in an Old English word meaning "goat town."

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CBS News
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Gotham
5/24/2019

Why it matters: The opening paragraph of this story is incredible and the rest of the piece will keep you wishing you could scroll faster.

Many people wish they could be a genius (or think they are). Lots of parents wish for their children to be considered "gifted." This story details what life can be like for a person who truly is a genius. It is an eye-opener because it details how something so many people yearn for can sometimes be a curse. It is the most fascinating story I've read in a long time.

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The Economist Group
5/24/2019

Why it matters: With the outcome of Brexit far from certain, Prime Minister Teresa May's announcement that she would step down on June 7 adds yet another layer of uncertainty.

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BBC
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Prime Minister Teresa May
5/24/2019

Why it matters: Communication has evolved (and gotten more complicated), but Morse code has withstood the test of time.

My favorite thing about Morse code is how what is arguably one of its most famous messages has been completely turned on its head by pop culture. Follow me here ... Aside from being a truly epic bar in Chicago, three dots and a dash is also the letter "V" in Morse code. During World War II, the Allies sent this message to convey victory ... V is for victory.

However, the sound of three dots and a dash is also strikingly similar to the opening notes of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5. And strangely, when just those four notes are used in modern movies scores and the like, it usually means something bad is going to happen -- not victory.

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The Conversation (US)