Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/18/2018

The airline industry is an example of how offering clear pricing tiers, starting with a cheap option that offers little or no perks, sets customer expectations and helps them decide whether to spend more, write Thomas A. Stewart and Patricia O'Connell. "By creating a class of service many passengers shun, basic economy appears to have made ordinary service seem less bad," they write.

10/18/2018

Thousands of companies are offering subscription boxes, and the most successful combine the element of surprise with secondary revenue streams, writes Elizabeth Segran. Ipsy makes advertising revenue from YouTube videos showing how to use its beauty products, Sephora Play seeks to drive customers to shop with the core brand and FabFitFun sells sponsorships from brands seeking to reach new customers.

Full Story:
Fast Company online
More Summaries:
Elizabeth Segran, YouTube, Ipsy, FabFitFun
10/18/2018

The worst part about success is that it can stall our learning, as we become overconfident and stop listening to other people, LaRae Quy writes. "To become an expert means that we move the marker down the line to show progress has been made," she writes.

Full Story:
SmartBrief/Leadership
More Summaries:
LaRae Quy
10/18/2018

You can prevent meetings from disrupting your day by determining if you need to attend, whether the information could be exchanged electronically or if someone else could go in your place, writes Scott Matteson. If attendance is required, hold fast to the agenda and keep yourself on schedule by lining up your meetings consecutively, he writes.

Full Story:
TechRepublic
More Summaries:
Scott Matteson
10/18/2018

Life, career and executive coaches take different paths, but each helps people examine themselves in a more objective way, writes David Mark. "Research has shown that most of us don't see ourselves very clearly and that it matters: accurate self-awareness in leaders is highly correlated with organizational effectiveness and profitability," he writes.

Full Story:
Michael Hyatt
10/18/2018

Presentations to the CEO or other executives will go awry if they don't clearly identify a problem and how a solution will improve the bottom line, writes Sabina Nawaz. Decision-makers will be more engaged if you leave ample time for their questions and have facts ready to support your answers, she writes.

More Summaries:
Sabina Nawaz
10/18/2018

A report by the Economic Innovation Group suggests that many parts of rural America are becoming more at risk economically even while metropolitan areas boom, writes Richard Florida. "While prosperous areas have already recovered all the jobs and businesses they lost during the recession, distressed areas are still losing jobs," Anna Hensel writes.

Full Story:
CityLab, VentureBeat
10/18/2018

One of the fastest-growing aggression-busters in US cities is ax throwing, with venues in Los Angeles, Tucson, Ariz., and Washington, D.C., among other places. Some of these venues also serve alcohol while saying they've taken safety precautions.

10/18/2018

Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis plans to buy US-based cancer-drug developer Endocyte for $2.1 billion. Earlier this year, Novartis bought gene therapy company AveXis for $8.7 billion.

More Summaries:
Novartis, Endocyte
10/18/2018

EBay is suing Amazon, claiming the company illegally used eBay's internal messaging system to get in touch with the auction site's sellers to persuade them to sell on Amazon's platform. EBay wants Amazon to pay monetary damages and to stop trying to lure eBay's sellers.

More Summaries:
eBay, Amazon