Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/19/2018

Elon Musk's ambition and revolutionary projects have captured imaginations and excited people about the future like none other in recent years, so many people are hoping he overcomes his recent setbacks, argue writers surveyed by Popular Mechanics. "Humanity's access to space appears to have been changed forever, filling people with hope and revitalizing our sense of exploration that had been so dulled," writes Ashlee Vance.

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Ashlee Vance, Popular Mechanics
10/19/2018

Conversations are conduits of influence, so we should use them to build up others and spark positive solutions to project or interpersonal work problems, writes Cheri Torres. Instead of getting frustrated, try asking open-ended questions when you see a colleague is frustrated or when a problem is complex and seems intractable.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Cheri Torres
10/19/2018

Leaders can't eliminate uncertainty, so they must learn to navigate it by instilling a team-first approach rather than the traditional hierarchical, one-man-knows-best approach, Chris Lewis argues.

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Great Leadership
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Chris Lewis
10/19/2018

Employees who are eager to please often take on too much work, which is all the more reason for CEOs and other leaders to establish clear goals for their teams, writes Joel Trammell, CEO of Black Box Network Services. "Once an employee truly understands the mission and strategy, he or she has a powerful sorting tool for incoming requests," he writes.

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Khorus blog
10/19/2018

Digital transformation isn't much different from overall strategy -- it should zero in on what sets a company apart and helps customers access that service or product, writes Nigel Fenwick of Forrester. "Ninety percent of your business is simply not that unique -- stop pretending that it is," he writes.

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Forrester
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Nigel Fenwick, Forrester
10/19/2018

Watch for other people's body language to detect how they are feeling toward you, and use that knowledge to adjust your own body language toward them, say authors James Pyle and Maryann Karinch. "Your body language is a response to them that is designed to get them into the state of mind you desire," they say.

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Maryann Karinch
10/19/2018

Sometimes an impromptu break can give us energy even as we're being active, writes Laura Vanderkam, who describes the benefits of a trip to the zoo with her children. "In other words, in the strange calculus of the energy equation, doing something can be more recharging than trying to do nothing," she writes.

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Laura Vanderkam
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Laura Vanderkam
10/19/2018

There's money to be made taking surveys online, but not much, writes Diane Shipley, who spent parts of 30 days filling out such forms. She only earned $34.77, failing to meet her goal of covering her phone bill.

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The Billfold
10/18/2018

The airline industry is an example of how offering clear pricing tiers, starting with a cheap option that offers little or no perks, sets customer expectations and helps them decide whether to spend more, write Thomas A. Stewart and Patricia O'Connell. "By creating a class of service many passengers shun, basic economy appears to have made ordinary service seem less bad," they write.

10/18/2018

Thousands of companies are offering subscription boxes, and the most successful combine the element of surprise with secondary revenue streams, writes Elizabeth Segran. Ipsy makes advertising revenue from YouTube videos showing how to use its beauty products, Sephora Play seeks to drive customers to shop with the core brand and FabFitFun sells sponsorships from brands seeking to reach new customers.

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Fast Company online
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Elizabeth Segran, YouTube, Ipsy, FabFitFun