Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/24/2019

Speakers can limit the use of filler words such as "um" and "ah" by staying silent between thoughts and using more hand gestures, writes Jim Anderson. "Your use of filler words can kill your credibility with your audience and that's why you need to take steps in order to make them go away," he writes.

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Jim Anderson
4/24/2019

Evaluating the quality of relationships involves observing organizational culture from the brain, the heart and the eyes, says S. Chris Edmonds in this blog post and video. "Relationships are strengthened when leaders and team members praise and thank colleagues and when colleagues' efforts and ideas are validated and recognized as much as accomplishments are," he says.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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S. Chris Edmonds
4/24/2019

Ruling out design thinking as a route to increasing return on investment is shortsighted, experts say. Leaders can help make the case for design thinking by explaining the risks of not taking a chance on it and by highlighting its customer-centric nature.

4/24/2019

Leaders need to shed their old identities, learn to nurture the talents of others and be willing to do necessary administrative tasks when moving from sales to management, says Harvard University Business School lecturer Frank Cespedes. "It's all about the difference between learning to take care of yourself and learning to take care of others, from being an individual contributor in sales to being a manager who gets things done through other people," he notes.

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Frank Cespedes
4/24/2019

Leaders can overcome personal development plateaus by seeking out and forming networks with their peers to learn new tactics and strategies, writes James Millar of SkyBridge Associates. He outlines five factors that keep executives from connecting with one another, including time constraints and low expectations.

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ThoughtLeaders
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James Millar
4/24/2019

Companies can improve the customer experience by going through their own customer process to spot problems and by questioning why they do things the way they do, writes Dave Fish of CuriosityCX. Executives should also spend time contemplating problems to ensure the solutions they propose address the real sticking point, he notes.

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CustomerThink
4/24/2019

Esther Wojcicki says the principles she used when raising three daughters who achieved business success -- YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, 23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki and pediatrics professor Janet Wojcicki -- are also useful for developing ethical, productive leaders. Her recently published book details a philosophy captured by the acronym TRICK, which stands for trust, respect, independence, collaboration, and kindness.

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Fortune
4/24/2019

Jell-O may primarily beckon childhood memories at this point in history, but gelatin-based desserts were seen as status symbols in the early 14th century. "The innovation of the 1990s pre-packaged, ready-to-eat Jell-O cups was the final blow to gelatin's place in culinary history," says food historian Christina Ward.

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Atlas Obscura
4/24/2019

Why it matters: The idea of using LEGO bricks to teach people braille is a no-brainer. Other groups have worked with the concept of Braille Bricks in the past, but now LEGO is taking the teaching method mainstream.

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TechCrunch
4/24/2019

Why it matters: Alzheimer's is a notoriously difficult disease to detect. New research suggests blood tests could be used to detect the presence of the kind of accelerating nerve cell damage in the brain that is linked to the disease. One of the lead researchers said blood tests may one day become the preferred method for detecting Alzheimer's and measuring the damage the disease has wrought.

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ScienceDaily
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Alzheimer