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Top stories summarized by our editors
4/9/2021

A culinary garden and teaching kitchen at Belle Chasse Academy in Louisiana are helping students learn hands-on lessons in math, social studies and science. Students grow the food they cook in the kitchen, and study topics such as the history of global cuisines as well as nutrition and healthy eating.

4/9/2021

Explaining the purpose behind social-emotional learning exercises can help students internalize the lesson, says educator Ashley Taplin. For example, Taplin suggests telling students when you are checking in with their feelings that knowing their energy level helps you determine how best to teach the day's class.

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Edutopia
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Taplin
4/9/2021

A vision statement can be the "most powerful tool in a principal's arsenal" and should be crafted from passion, writes Robyn Jackson, author, former educator and president of Mindsteps professional development firm. Jackson discusses specificity, not settling and several other factors for creating an ideal vision statement.

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Robyn Jackson
4/8/2021

California would be the first state to ensure universal breakfasts and lunches for all students if the proposed Universal Meal Plan legislation is adopted. The bill -- introduced by state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley -- would establish the universal meal program in the 2022-23 school year and would remove the typical application process used for the National School Lunch Program.

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EdSource
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Sen. Nancy Skinner
4/8/2021

The US Education Department cited Washington, D.C.'s high number of remote students and concerns about safe spaces for test administration in its decision issued this week to grant a broad waiver from the annual assessments required by the Every Student Succeeds Act. The department also said Oregon may reduce the number of tests it gives but did not permit Michigan and Montana to use local tests instead of state assessments, and did not grant New York's request to cancel testing.

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Education Week
4/8/2021

A $12.1 million bump in state education funding for the next fiscal year recommended by Ill. Governor J.B. Pritzker will not be enough to allow schools to overcome pandemic-related equity issues or address a $4,500-per-student funding gap among some schools, Illinois State Board of Education Chairman Darren Reisberg and Advance Illinois advocacy group President Robin Steans say. The board is asking instead for a 4.6% -- or $406.5 million -- increase compared with the current year.

4/7/2021

Almost 46% of public schools in the US were open to in-person instruction five days a week in February, yet only 34% of students were participating in full-time, in-person learning, according to data released today by President Joe Biden's administration. The data shows that more older students are learning online, and more students in the South and Midwest are learning in person.

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The Associated Press
4/7/2021

Since the start of the pandemic, there has been a heightened focus on student engagement. Educators have grappled with how to keep students showing up, paying attention, and putting in a high level of work and enthusiasm, even as those students dealt with the profound trauma of a tumultuous year. Yet, we know that even before the pandemic, not all students were fully engaged and invested in school and that engagement will continue to be important beyond Covid. Read this guide that addresses 7 common student challenges and presents simple, effective strategies to address them in virtual, hybrid, and in-classroom settings. Get the Guide.

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info.betterlesson.com
4/7/2021

COVID-19 testing and screening was "an absolute game changer" that allowed Gower School District 62 in Illinois to reopen for in-person learning full time in August, Superintendent Victor Simon explained in a recent webinar. Duval County Public Schools Superintendent Diana Greene of Jacksonville, Fla., shared layered mitigation solutions her district devised when faced with obstacles related to budget and space.

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K-12 Dive
4/7/2021

Students in seventh through 12th grades at Saint Joseph's Catholic School in Mississippi are learning about broadcast journalism in an elective course. The students learn the ins and outs of the news business and produce a live, three-hour broadcast on Friday evenings.