Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/20/2020

Income-share agreements are gaining traction in the US, with more than five dozen universities and coding schools offering the arrangement to help students cover college costs. Proponents of ISAs say the approach gives students a safety net and gives colleges an incentive to help students succeed, but critics say ISAs are simply a new form of debt that can have questionable contract terms.

Full Story:
The Hechinger Report
2/20/2020

The American Talent Initiative reported an increase in enrollment of low-income students at colleges with high graduation rates, with 320 schools with graduation rates of at least 70% boosting low- and middle-income student enrollment by almost 21,000 in two years since 2015-16. However, data shows progress leveled off at 120 ATI member institutions in the 2018-19 academic year, and experts say college leaders must make the issue a priority to maintain progress.

2/20/2020

Purdue University is launching the Purdue Fast Start Program to give students the option of earning up to one year's worth of credits while they are attending high school. Through a partnership with Modern States Education Alliance, students can earn tuition-free credits for courses aligned with College Board exams that are widely accepted for college credit nationwide.

More Summaries:
Purdue, Purdue
2/20/2020

Darryl Pines, the newly appointed president of the University of Maryland, is one of the very few presidents of color at a major university, writes Andre Perry, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow at The Brookings Institution. There are no black presidents in Southeastern Conference schools despite a large black population, and "university administrators and faculty continually wax poetic about the benefits of diversity, but they rarely move beyond words when it's time to appoint a new president," Perry writes in this opinion piece.

Full Story:
The Hechinger Report
More Summaries:
The Brookings Institution
2/20/2020

New College of Florida President Donal O'Shea urged state lawmakers to stop plans to merge the college with Florida State University. Lawmakers say the college's degrees cost too much compared with public universities, but O'Shea said those calculations are flawed because they include graduate-level degrees, which take less time to complete and decrease overall costs.

2/19/2020

Three National Association for College Admission Counseling provisions the Justice Department objected to were in place to help standardize the admission process, aid colleges in enrollment management and limit student "poaching," write Hamilton College President David Wippman and Glenn Altschuler of Cornell University. NACAC members say the rules are in the best interest of both colleges and students, and students and parents should be concerned that the Justice Department views schools as businesses selling services and students as consumers, Wippman and Altschuler write in this opinion piece.

Full Story:
The Hill
2/19/2020

A Jain Family Institute report finds that "education deserts" often have just one higher-education institution to choose from and are prime targets of for-profit colleges. Areas such as the Rocky Mountain and Plains regions have little or no access to a college, and for-profit schools are drawn to these regions "just as they are known to draw disproportionately from populations historically excluded from traditional higher ed on the basis of race and class," the report's authors wrote.

Full Story:
Yahoo
2/19/2020

Loyola University New Orleans is letting some newly admitted students take a free three-credit course in the hope of enticing them to enroll in the school. The effort was implemented by Sarah Kelly, senior vice president for enrollment management and student affairs, who says an average of 70% of students in a similar program at Saint Michael's College in Vermont enrolled.

Full Story:
Inside Higher Ed
More Summaries:
Saint Michael's College
2/19/2020

The decline in college enrollment can be likened to climate change, with some denying its existence for awhile and many now taking the "acknowledge, but wait for a miracle" attitude, community college dean Matt Reed writes in this blog post. However, unlike climate change, enrollment challenges can be corrected by taking new approaches such as targeting older and working adults and embracing online teaching, Reed writes.

Full Story:
Inside Higher Ed
2/19/2020

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., announced the Preparing and Resourcing Our Student Parents and Early Childhood Teachers Act, which would invest $9 billion over five years to fund child care for community-college students who are parents. The legislation would fund grant programs for community colleges serving minority students and help pay for free child care for as many as 500,000 children under three years of age.

More Summaries:
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand