Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/9/2020

Nonprofit programs such as OneGoal, iMentor and College Possible that help low-income and first-generation students transition to college are scaling back fundraising and turning to online mentoring and chats to keep students engaged in the college admission process during the coronavirus pandemic. Counselors also worry that students will forgo college in the fall due to financial constraints, especially if learning is online.

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Chalkbeat
4/9/2020

Amy Morrison, president of Lake Washington Institute of Technology, was among the first college leaders to respond to the coronavirus outbreak in the US. Other administrators in the Seattle area soon took action as well, according to this account of the early days of the crisis.

4/9/2020

About 15% of high-school seniors who planned to attend a four-year college said they likely won't attend school in the fall in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, results of a small survey show. Of current college students, the survey found 65% said online teaching was inferior to their in-person classes.

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Inside Higher Ed
4/9/2020

The University of South Florida is moving its spring graduation ceremony online, which it expects will cost $6,000, compared to $60,000 for a traditional one-day ceremony. The video will be filmed with student body presidents and select administrators, and the names of each student will be read.

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University of South Florida
4/9/2020

Professor raises barely rose above the cost-of-living index last year, according to the American Association of University Professors' annual Faculty Compensation Survey. In addition, average faculty salaries for women were 81.4% of men's.

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Inside Higher Ed
4/9/2020

Universities are increasingly looking to mega-gifts to shore up finances, but the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent economic downturn could affect that, writes Mike Scutari. Universities might pivot instead to tapping more alumni who give smaller gifts.

4/8/2020

College students at the University of Wisconsin and at schools across the country are scrambling to cope with sudden layoffs from campus jobs that they rely on to pay tuition and living expenses. Many of the student employees are paid through a federal work-study program that includes a university match, and the university says it will offer partial compensation in the short term to the students.

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University of Wisconsin
4/8/2020

A modern career relies on a portfolio of skills that allows people to earn money from a range of sources, thus providing financial security in the event that one of those sources goes away, writes career coach Dawn Graham. These careers allow a person to grow and adapt to an ever-changing job market while pursuing a range of interests, she writes.

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Forbes
4/8/2020

Many universities are switching to pass/fail grades or offering students the option of taking a pass/fail grade rather than a letter grade amid coronavirus-related campus closures. However, some experts say the pass/fail might not be accepted at other universities or for graduate or professional training, requiring students to retake classes.

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PBS
4/8/2020

Faculty, staff and students at universities are finding ways to do their part in the fight against the coronavirus, mixing up sanitizer in chemistry labs, collecting supplies, repurposing equipment, babysitting and running errands. Some are using 3D printers to make face shields, while others are using equipment to decontaminate face masks.

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Inside Higher Ed