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Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/14/2021

Amid coronavirus-induced uncertainty, some students are reluctant to sign leases for off-campus housing for the school year that starts this fall. In addition, some students are less willing to pay rent premiums for housing near campus given that student activities have been curtailed with the pandemic, according to Carl Whitaker of RealPage.

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WealthManagement
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Carl Whitaker
1/14/2021

Higher-education leaders and legislators in California shared in a recent online forum that they intend to make it easier for community-college students to transfer into the state's public or private universities. A new transfer planning tool being developed by the California State University system is aimed at helping students plan and track the transfer process to its campuses.

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EdSource
1/14/2021

Diverse representation in any room where a decision is being made is vital to solving problems, North Shore Community College interim President Nate Bryant said at a recent leadership forum in Massachusetts. He says a single representative is not enough and that leaders at the table need to come from "different divisions, different unions, different departments and different working groups" to effect real change.

1/14/2021

Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover is looking for answers on years' worth of federal grant funding and state money that never arrived in the school's coffers, as per a Tennessee legislative report released last summer. The University of Tennessee, on the other hand, got full funding -- and sometimes extra -- for the years in question, the report found.

1/13/2021

Stanford University made a last-minute change this week, telling freshmen and sophomores they no longer may move back to campus housing beginning Monday for the winter quarter. A rise in coronavirus cases in the state, as well as 43 recent positive tests at the university, prompted the decision, and officials anticipate reopening residence halls in the summer.

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Stanford University, Stanford U.
1/13/2021

With the deployment of COVID-19 vaccines, it is now time to start thinking about what school can and might look light when we can all be together in person again, says Dr. Kecia Ray. But where do we begin? We've been in a state of reaction for so many months; how can we get back to strategic visioning and planning? Like any journey, it all starts with one step at a time.

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Tech & Learning
1/13/2021

A recent study from the National Center for Research on Education Access and Choice at Tulane University examined the relationship between school reopenings and local hospitalizations for Covid-19 nationwide. Findings indicate that the U.S. counties in which Covid-19 hospitalizations were already low, reopening schools was not associated with increased hospitalizations. However, as hospitalizations increased it was impossible to tell what impact reopening schools had.

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Tech & Learning
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Tulane University
1/13/2021

Esports and academics continue to become more integrated every year. For some schools, setting up a program is a relatively easy task to accomplish with lots of support. For others, the resources to draw from may not be as robust or as plentiful. Knowing what to do -- and what to not to -- can help get a program off on the right foot.

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Tech & Learning
1/13/2021

According to LinkedIn data from April to October, the top rising jobs include e-commerce workers and health care workers. In addition, the need for mortgage and loan officers has risen in response to low interest rates, and job openings for experts in diversity, equity and inclusion are up 90% over last year.

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Fast Company online
1/13/2021

The University of Nevada has developed a roadmap for providing the coronavirus vaccine to students and faculty, although the school is not requiring the vaccine, student health Director Cheryl Hug-English says. Staff and students will be offered the vaccine in four waves, beginning with front-line workers, moving into certain education and child care staff, then remaining staff and students, and, finally, all other healthy people on campus.

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KOLO-TV (Reno, Nev.)
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University of Nevada