Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/18/2018

Iowa State University has reached its $1.1 billion fundraising goal two years ahead of schedule and is now aiming to raise $1.5 billion by June 2021. President Wendy Wintersteen says the money will help recruit new faculty, implement programs to boost graduation rates and enhance the student experience.

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Iowa State University
10/17/2018

A US District judge on Tuesday allowed to take effect borrower defense rules meant to grant student-loan relief to students defrauded by colleges. Judge Randolph Moss denied a request to delay implementation of the rules after he ruled in September that it was illegal for US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to delay them.

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Randolph Moss, Betsy DeVos
10/17/2018

Two annual reports on college pricing and financial aid from The College Board show that sticker prices for four-year public colleges and universities rose slower than inflation, signaling that college prices may be decreasing. One factor contributing to the change may be a recent rise in state funding for institutions, but college costs for public universities still make up 20% of a median family income, the report shows.

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Money magazine
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College Board
10/17/2018

A survey of student affairs professionals found that 71% identified as liberal or very liberal, while only 6% indicated they were conservative. Samuel Abrams, a Sarah Lawrence College professor, says the imbalance is a threat to the "open exchange of ideas," but Kevin Kruger, president of NASPA - Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, says staff are committed to "open dialogue" despite personal views.

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Inside Higher Ed
10/17/2018

College and university leaders can boost the public image of higher education by changing how institutions are funded and how students are financially supported, writes Michael Neitzel, president emeritus of Missouri State University. In this commentary, he outlines how policy changes in funding and scholarships can enhance the value of a degree.

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Forbes
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Missouri State University
10/16/2018

Colleges and universities can improve student outcomes by implementing a "purpose first" philosophy that focuses on providing career assessments and guided pathways to help students prepare for the workforce, according to a report from Complete College America. CCA official Dhanfu Elston says it's vitally important for low-income and first-generation students to have career information integrated into their studies.

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Complete College America
10/16/2018

A survey shows that nearly half of all college students say they will vote in the Nov. 6 midterm elections, with 57% of Democratic students pledging to vote, compared with 40.5% of Republican students. Nancy Thomas, director of the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education at Tufts University, says some barriers to student voting remain, including identification laws and other requirements.

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Tufts University
10/16/2018

Attorneys for Students for Fair Admissions told a US District Court judge this week that Harvard University engages in "intentional discrimination" against Asian-American students, while attorneys for the school argued that race is never viewed as a negative in admissions. No matter the outcome, some legal experts say the case may be brought before the US Supreme Court.

10/16/2018

Students with parents who have more income and general wealth are more likely to enroll in college and graduate than students with less-wealthy parents, according to a study. Wealthier parents also were more likely than other parents to take out home-equity loans to help pay for a college education, the data showed.

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Inside Higher Ed
10/15/2018

US colleges report an increase in reports of past sexual assault and harassment on campus from former students that could be fueled, in part, by the #MeToo movement. Some schools are reacting by dropping time limits on investigations, but many officials say their ability to take action against alleged offenders may be limited.

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The Associated Press