Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/4/2019

The Senate education committee released an amendment to the HBCU funding bill to make permanent $255 million in annual funding for HCBUs and other minority-serving institutions. The amendment would also simplify the FAFSA application by dropping as many as 22 questions from the form.

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Inside Higher Ed
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Senate Education Committee
12/4/2019

Consultant Karen Kelsky in this article describes situations in which it would be advantageous to mention that you have personal ties to a college's area in a cover letter. Small liberal arts colleges tend to be nestled in a community that focuses on them, she writes, and are more apt to consider a candidate whom they feel would be drawn to the area, not just the open position.

12/4/2019

The 2019 MassMutual Workplace Financial Wellness Study showed 79% of employers surveyed said their employees struggled financially, with some of the most common problems being credit card and consumer debt, daily expenses and an inability to save for retirement. The survey showed 57% of employers said employees are seeking help at work in solving personal financial problems.

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401(k) Specialist
12/4/2019

Georgetown University requires applicants for admission to send all their scores on the ACT and SAT, but this begs the question of who "owns" the scores -- the student or the college. "Is a college application a curated work of art designed to put the student's 'best foot forward,' or is an applicant, like a witness in court, required to tell 'the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth'?" writes college counselor Jim Jump.

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Inside Higher Ed
12/4/2019

The Center for Biological Diversity and the Sierra Club have filed a lawsuit against the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill concerning air pollution emissions from its boilers. The lawsuit does not point to any specific cases of illness, but says, "The air pollution that UNC emits can cause a wide variety of adverse impacts including asthma attacks, decreased lung function, especially among young people, and even premature mortality."

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Sierra Club, University of
12/4/2019

A university's credit rating often stays solid even in the event of a campus disaster or scandal, a report from S&P Global Ratings finds. The report says that crises rarely affect enrollment or fundraising, which are big components of a credit analysis.

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Education Dive
12/4/2019

The Division of Diversity, Equity & Educational Achievement at the University of Wisconsin-Madison released its inaugural annual report on diversity and inclusivity, citing achievements such as the installation of a heritage marker by the Native Nations Working Group and the highest attendence record to date for the annual Diversity Forum. The report also highlighted achievements by students and provided an overview of the REEL Change implementation plan.

12/3/2019

California is one of only four states, along with Hawaii, North Dakota and Wyoming, that are spending more money on higher education than they did in 2008, data shows. Strategies designed to address some of the challenges that schools and students face include offering small grants to enable students to finish school, pushing transfers from two-year to four-year schools and eliminating noncredit remedial courses.

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The Hechinger Report
12/3/2019

A shift in higher education is to be expected as workers require more continuing education to navigate the evolving job market, speakers said at a recent conference hosted by the European think tank The Class of 2020 in Berlin. Employment no longer will be "a frill on top of the academic discipline," but will be incorporated into the curriculum, explained Sonal Minocha, Global University Systems' chief academic officer, while David Lefevre of Imperial College London predicted that these changes will particularly affect the postgraduate education sector.

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The PIE News (UK)
12/3/2019

The debate over campus "wellbeing weeks," particularly during exam time, continues with dog-petting, gardening sessions and knitting groups scheduled. But some students feel stress could be better relieved by spreading out classwork, offering test redoes and not scheduling work over the holidays.

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The Guardian (London)