K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/16/2018

Students who have time for contemplative reflection during the school day are better able to retain what they learn, writes Dana Weeks, head of Germantown Friends School. In this blog post, she shares how her own school ensures students have time to be silent with their thoughts.

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Edutopia online
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Germantown Friends School
10/16/2018

A one-on-one laptop program in a North Carolina school district had a much more limited effect on students' academic performance than was previously thought, according to a study co-authored by Marie Hull, an economist at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The study shows that students who received the laptops read less -- only 40 minutes per day, down from 45 minutes.

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The Hechinger Report
10/16/2018

Math students at one Kentucky elementary school used multiplication, division, area and perimeter calculation to figure out how many Post-It Notes their teacher would need to create Halloween-themed portraits on the library windows. Teacher Tyler Watts, who has done other Post-It projects at the school, eventually used 5,982 notes to create his portraits.

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Kentucky elementary school
10/16/2018

A Kansas elementary school with a student body that speaks more than 50 languages is helping refugee and immigrant students learn English and adjust to going to school -- some students are in school for the first time -- in the US. Educators are teaching students concepts and how to use tools, including pencils and scissors, that others may take for granted.

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Kansas elementary school
10/16/2018

Educators can help prepare students for the future by demonstrating how important is to "investigate the world," asserts Charle LaMonica, director of World View, a public service program at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. In this commentary, LaMonica shares how students benefited from a teacher's trip to the Dominican Republic in partnership with the Global Youth Leadership Institute.

10/16/2018

A class of West Virginia first-grade students have completed 100,000 math problems since school began in August. The class, which now will aim for 500,000 completed problems, got a grant to access an online program that they use to hold math competitions.

10/16/2018

Teenagers who use their cellphones to make phone calls more often score slightly lower than their peers on a memory test, according to a study of 700 teens by researchers at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, Switzerland. Researchers posit that radiation may be responsible for the difference.

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Science News
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Public Health Institute
10/16/2018

A group of New Jersey middle-school students wanted to build an invention that would help prevent concussions after a friend was affected by one. In this blog post, teacher Jonathan Harvey shares how his students won the Samsung Solve For Tomorrow contest with their football helmet sensor that helps to detect sudden movements in the head and signs of a concussion.

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SmartBrief/Education
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Jonathan Harvey, Samsung, New Jersey
10/16/2018

The number of students in New York City's public schools living in temporary housing reached a record 114,659 this past school year, according to the Advocates for Children of New York. This marked the third year in a row that the number exceeded 100,000, the group said.

10/16/2018

"Fidelity testing" can ensure that school safety measures function in real-world situations, asserts Michael Dorn, executive director of the nonprofit Safe Havens International. In this commentary, he offers some examples of how schools can test the fidelity of their safety protocols.