K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/24/2019

Some schools across the country are revamping the design of their classrooms to include flexible seating -- to promote more collaboration and creativity among students. Robert Dillon, director of innovation for a St. Louis, Mo., school district, says, "Brain research tells us that movement in a classroom matters, choice matters."

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The Hechinger Report
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Robert Dillon
6/24/2019

Caragan Olles, 17, co-founded a Wisconsin organization dedicated to helping others with dyslexia after she was diagnosed with the condition. Olles was 10 when she created Bright Young Dyslexics with her older brother to help peers with dyslexia gain access to resources such as assistive technology and phonics tutoring, and this year, Olles was honored as among the top 10 youth volunteers in the US.

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Caragan Olles, Wisconsin
6/24/2019

It can be challenging for teachers to balance all of their responsibilities, writes Barbara Blackburn, a former teacher and school leader. In this commentary, Blackburn shares seven time-saving strategies for teachers to avoid feeling overwhelmed, including by working with other teachers and creating a system for organizing tasks.

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MiddleWeb
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Barbara Blackburn
6/24/2019

The use of smart speakers and voice-activated learning tools in K-12 classrooms is the focus of several sessions at this week's International Society for Technology in Education's annual conference. Maureen Yoder, a professor at Lesley University in Cambridge, Mass., says such devices can help respond to some student questions and facilitate foreign-language learning.

6/24/2019

Based on advice from a mentor teacher, Jill Bernstein -- now a lead teacher at a school in Massachusetts -- made an effort to have regular conversations with a difficult student, showing him that she cared about him personally. In this commentary, she shares how seeing students as people first helped improve outcomes for her math and science students.

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The Hechinger Report
6/24/2019

Baton Rouge Community College started its Program for Successful Employment in 2017, and each year, it helps 20 students with disabilities learn skills to help them find employment. The state-funded program focuses heavily on communication skills and confidence, two areas in which otherwise qualified people with disabilities tend to have difficulty in their job search.

6/24/2019

Students at one Vermont middle school since 2015 have been using online resources and documents from a local historical society to interview people and produce radio pieces, podcasts and newspaper articles on local history. Students say doing research and interviews gives them a fresh perspective on where they live.

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Vermont middle school
6/24/2019

Students in a New York state school district are gaining firsthand job experience through partnerships with local businesses, writes Shari Camhi, superintendent of the Baldwin Union Free School District. In this commentary, she shares why the district works to help students get career exposure both inside and outside of school.

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Education Dive
6/24/2019

A bill moving through the Michigan legislature would no longer require 11th-grade students to take a workforce-readiness test under state standards. Supporters say doing away with the test will free up classroom time, but opponents say the requirement shows students have the math and reading skills needed to enter the workforce.

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The Associated Press
6/24/2019

STEAM students at one New York high school challenged their math and engineering skills by building an octagonal pavilion at a local museum. Science teacher Rob Hughes says the odd shape was chosen because it fit the history of the region when octagonal buildings were built right before the Civil War because they were more energy efficient and saved space.

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New York high school