K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/14/2019

Incorporating scaffolding into science lessons can help encourage critical thinking by students, according to physics education expert and Cornell University assistant professor Natasha Holmes. A study co-authored by Holmes found that a set of physics students who use data and feedback in their decisions were better able to think critically and use focused reasoning to improve understanding than students who followed a set of instructions in the lab.

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Forbes
11/14/2019

A group of students who participated in the Arab Reading Challenge recently learned they are semifinalists in the contest's category of students from non-Arab countries. The students, who are collectively from 22 countries, share why they were inspired to learn their mother tongue for the competition despite facing obstacles to acquiring and retaining the language.

11/14/2019

Educator "ambassadors" who receive free promotional items -- including products and services -- must publicize their relationship with the vendor and the product if they tout the items on social media, according to a recent determination by the Federal Trade Commission. This requirement is part of recent guidelines issued for social media influencers.

11/14/2019

Ten percent of parents say they often have conversations with their children -- ages 3 to 12 -- about race and identity, according to a report from Sesame Workshop. About 35% of parents say they never speak with their children about social class, the report states.

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The Hechinger Report
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Sesame Workshop
11/14/2019

There are several digital tools that teachers can use to develop math lessons that are visually appealing for students, says high-school math teacher Stacey Roshan. Roshan says she has found success by using instructional videos to flip classroom learning and she shares her recommendations for digital math tools.

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Stacey Roshan
11/14/2019

Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, states are required to set "ambitious" goals based on graduation rates and student progress on state exams, but data shows some states are not on track to meet their long-term goals. While the law does not penalize states for failure to meet the goals, Chad Aldeman, a senior associate partner at Bellwether Education Partners, says the process used by some states to set the targets seemed arbitrary.

11/14/2019

No one person can guide school-improvement efforts, long-time educator Jim Dillon writes. In this blog post, Dillon asserts that educators must rely on the collective sum of their experience and wisdom to arrive at solutions and he offers some questions for educators to consider as a group.

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SmartBrief/Education
11/14/2019

Eighth-graders at St. Louis Park Middle School in Minnesota are taking part in the "We Share Solar" project, which brings solar power to schools in refugee camps. The students are constructing 12-volt power sources called "solar suitcases," and are learning about climate science and energy in the process, teacher Katie Small says.

11/14/2019

Aurora Public Schools in Colorado has invested $35 million in mental health -- bringing in 100 mental health professionals including social workers -- which the district says has improved academic outcomes. Social workers teach students coping skills, meeting with them in small groups.

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KMGH-TV (Denver)
11/14/2019

Elementary schools in Vermont's White River Valley Supervisory Union have launched a program designed to help improve students' reading comprehension. The Raising Readers program offers classroom materials and professional development for teachers.

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Vermont