Industry News
K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/21/2020

Blending social justice and the real-world applications of math can help reluctant students embrace the subject, former math teacher Colin Seale writes in this article. Seale offers this and other ways to engage students in math learning, such as tapping into students' competitive natures and sharing the stories of people such as Thomas Edison, who found success in STEM while considering himself deficient in math.

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Edutopia
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Thomas Edison
5/21/2020

A California teacher assigned his students to keep pandemic journals -- an assignment that has been mimicked by educators worldwide, including in Sri Lanka. Shane Carter, the outreach coordinator for the University of California-Berkeley's History Social-Science Project, is saving pandemic journals from students and teachers so that they can be shared as primary source documents for future generations.

5/21/2020

Children's storybooks, such as "Where the Wild Things Are," can help make literary theory more understandable for high-school students, according to Crystalee Calderwood, a high-school English teacher. In this blog post, Calderwood shares how she uses such books to introduce students to complex topics.

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Edutopia
5/21/2020

Idaho students are continuing to learn about the fish that they were raising in the classroom for release in the wild. Jennifer Jackson, who runs the Trout in the Classroom program for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, says shifting to an online environment is a challenge but she recently shared a trout dissection, which was streamed and recorded with assistance from a state museum.

5/21/2020

Distance learning has presented challenges for English-language-learning students and their teachers, especially students who lack technology at home to do schoolwork. To manage these challenges, New Jersey teacher Maria Montroni-Currais, whose students collectively speak 10 languages, has turned to various tools for help such as creating a worksheet that has been translated into 20 languages and can be completed offline.

5/21/2020

The traditional motivations for students, such as grades, no longer are available during this prolonged period of remote instruction, so many students are disengaging, writes Tim Klein, project lead for the True North Program at Boston College. In this commentary, Klein shares research showing that intrinsic motivation and investing in students' holistic well-being can be even more of an incentive than grades.

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EdSurge
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Tim Klein
5/21/2020

A school district in Ohio is moving toward treating broadband internet access like public utilities, such as electricity and water. The district is working with a local nonprofit, DigitalC, to provide internet connectivity to students' homes by 2022, for a cost to the district of $16 per month.

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The 74
5/21/2020

Health experts say that schools will look and feel different when they reopen, and some assert it's likely that even with precautions there will be additional outbreaks of the coronavirus that affect schools. Nellie Brown, director of workplace health and safety programs at the Worker Institute at Cornell University, says to expect changes to the cafeteria, classroom seating and in bathrooms by replacing hand dryers with paper towels.

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EdSurge
5/21/2020

School closures are widening the achievement gap for many students, particularly those who lack home internet access or for whom English is not their first language. School leaders now are considering how best to address learning losses for students, some of whom may have missed months of school.

5/21/2020

The CDC has released detailed reopening guidelines for schools, mass transit systems, restaurants and other businesses, outlining a three-phase strategy for reducing social distancing and the use of six benchmarks to move through the phases, such as declines in new COVID-19 cases and emergency visits and more testing. According to the 60-page document, schools should remain closed; restaurants should limit operations to curbside takeout, delivery and drive-thru; and mass transit should limit ridership to essential employees in the initial phase.

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CNBC, The Hill