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K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/22/2020

Students in the Boston Public Schools will attend remote classes beginning today as the officials worry about coronavirus data in the city. Positivity rates have increased in the last week, prompting Mayor Marty Walsh to close schools where a small number of students attended two days a week and scuttle this week's plans for K-3 students to start in-person learning.

10/22/2020

Prekindergarten and kindergarten students are being exposed to the Michif language as part of a play-based learning program by the Métis Nation-Saskatchewan in Canada. This article shines light on the people behind efforts to preserve the Michif language, including 80-year-old Jeanne Pelletier, who is sharing the language, a mix of Cree and French, and culture with students in the program.

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Global News (Canada)
10/22/2020

A Gary Paulsen novel was the impetus for sixth-grade students from Boaz Middle School in Alabama enhancing their STEM education by going outside to build temporary shelters, says teacher Sara Allen. The middle-schoolers had to follow certain criteria, using only tarps and items found in nature, all while learning about survival skills, cooperation and leadership as they read about in "Hatchet," Allen says.

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Hatchet
10/22/2020

More than 80% of students in 13 states have adequate at-home resources to support remote instruction, according to analysis from the National Education Association. The states with the highest percentages are New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut, while Mississippi, Arkansas and New Mexico have the most students without access to remote learning tools.

10/22/2020

High-school math and business technology teacher Susanna Post has been named Arkansas Teacher of the Year, thanks to her extensive involvement that includes creating the school's first coding club, assisting with district math curriculum development, and leading her school's Culture Project Week. She credits some of her success as a teacher to an empathetic view of students -- "understanding them and what they need to learn."

10/22/2020

Lou Tobacco, the head of Monsignor Farrell High School in Staten Island, N.Y., took advantage of the six months the school was closed for the coronavirus pandemic to spend $4.7 million upgrading the technology and facilities of the all-boys Catholic school. A marine biology ecosystem, life-size virtual dissection table, and AutoCAD and video game programming are just some of the new features that will benefit STEM students.

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Advance
10/22/2020

Students from low-income households could be affected -- academically and over the long term -- from prolonged school closures and helping them recover may call for new learning models, says high-school principal Ramona Esparza. "I just don't see us putting those kids back. We have to rethink education and how we are going to catch them up," Esparza says.

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Las Vegas Sun
10/22/2020

School professionals and health experts in Boston warn that school closures prompted by the pandemic have cut off access to dental care for nearly 4,000 schoolchildren in the area. Partnerships between schools and dentists enable care for children who otherwise might go without treatment, but even as schools reopen, dentists have been asked to find other ways to reach these patients. Workarounds have included virtual classes and pop-up clinics, but outreach continues to be a challenge.

10/22/2020

Most schools in Malaysia use Manually Coded Bahasa Malaysia, despite Malaysian Sign Language being recognized as the official sign language of the deaf in the country's Persons with Disabilities Act 2008, says Harry Tan Huat Hock, secretary-general of the National Union of the Teaching Profession. The union and others are pushing for a shift to Malaysian Sign Language, which they say is faster and faster than spelling out words to students who are deaf.

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The Star (Malaysia)
10/22/2020

Union County Public Schools in North Carolina has expanded its virtual learning options to include its dual language immersion program in Mandarin and Spanish. There are 2,000 students in the immersion programs, with 140 students attending the all virtual option, as the district works to promote biliteracy among students, says Jessica Garner, the district's director of college readiness.