Industry News
K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/14/2021

Making diverse language choices in lessons -- such as the singular "they" as a gender-neutral pronoun and capitalizing Black in relation to race -- is one way teachers can be more inclusive of all students' cultures and experiences, writes Randi Bender, the chief content officer at Reading Plus. Among Bender's other suggestions include ensuring texts and lessons mirror student identities and offer a window into the experiences of others.

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Reading Plus
1/14/2021

Students in a class for English-language learners at a Massachusetts high school are learning how to grow produce in an on-campus garden while sharing their knowledge of foods with one another -- all while learning English. The students, who come from Puerto Rico, the Philippines and other places, have bonded over foods that their cultures have in common, such as the sweet potato.

1/14/2021

All teachers across all grade levels have an opportunity to integrate next week's presidential inauguration in lessons, says Stefanie Wager, president of the National Council for the Social Studies. Besides lessons about the US' historically peaceful transfer of power, Wager and others say the inauguration offers potential for math classes, such as studying the economics of the event and the role of taxpayer funding.

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K-12 Dive
1/14/2021

The CDC has classified school staff as essential workers, and federal vaccine distribution guidance places them in the 1b category -- among the first to receive the vaccine. Yet, the timeline to vaccinate school staff varies nationwide because states establish their own priority guidelines.

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National Public Radio
1/14/2021

The IBM Family Science Saturday Program is bringing inquiry-based, hands-on STEM exploration to about 20 fifth-graders from St. Augustine's School in Ossining, N.Y, with workshops covering subjects such as kitchen chemistry and artificial intelligence. Mary Jane Daley, a regional superintendent for Catholic schools in the area, believes the extra-curricular program will encourage students to pursue STEM careers.

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Catholic New York
1/14/2021

An eighth-grade math teacher's suggestion that student Nashlie Sephus attend a hands-on engineering camp for girls at a nearby university led to a promising career path for Sephus, who now manages the Amazon Web Services machine-learning group. Sephus is giving back to her hometown of Jackson, Miss. by funding a tech hub, as well as a local nonprofit offering technical assistance to students.

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IEEE Spectrum online
1/14/2021

A New Orleans elementary school is offering "golden tokens" to students who achieve certain goals to select a book from a vending machine in the school. The Inchy's Bookworm machine is stocked with a variety of books, and Zachary Elementary School Principal Keisha Thomas says it makes students excited about reading and encourages better behavior.

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Jacques Cousteau
1/14/2021

School principals have faced and overcome unprecedented challenges over the past year, and this article highlights four such leaders. Quentin Lee, principal of Childersburg High School in Alabama, used his background as a band director to share songs with the school community via videos, and Michelle Kefford, principal of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, created "Kefford's Kitchen" so students can raise questions and concerns to her during lunch.

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K-12 Dive
1/13/2021

Data can be a powerful tool to improve teaching and learning, three educators say in this blog post. Luiza Mureseanu, an instructional resource teacher in Ontario, Canada, discusses the adjustments she makes based on information she gathers from Google Forms, exit tickets, notes, surveys and interviews with students.

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Education Week
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Luiza Mureseanu
1/13/2021

Almost one in four teachers -- roughly 1.5 million educators -- have a medical condition that places them at greater risk for a serious outcome from COVID-19, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. As plans to provide vaccines to teachers take shape, medical accommodations for at-risk employees varies across the US, with New York City schools approving about 34,000 of 38,000 requests and a district in Texas rejecting more than 95% of the requests that have been made.

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The 74