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8/15/2018

A study from RAND Corp. showed that math teachers who used at least one book in line with the Common Core State Standards said they were able to engage their students on key concepts. However, according to survey data of 625 math teachers across the country, few teachers are using such books.

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Rand Corporation
8/15/2018

Pioneer High School and Sharyland High School in Texas are offering students a 40-hour course to help them earn certification to pilot a drone. Students in this portion of the career and technical education program will then study the rest of the year how drones are used in damage assessments and search and rescue operations.

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Pioneer High School
8/15/2018

This article includes ideas from experts and education leaders as well as examples of innovation and leadership as the new school year begins. Ideas include seeking coaching, strengthening relationships and shadowing students.

8/15/2018

Chicago elementary-school principal Marilyn McCottrell has worked to close the academic gap between black girls and boys in her school since black boys were improving at a slower rate. "Nothing is solved," McCottrell said, but the school is making progress by focusing more time on boys, revamping grading standards and using restorative justice practices.

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Chalkbeat
8/15/2018

An Indiana school district has boosted the leadership skills of both faculty and students, writes the district's assistant superintendent, Lynn Simmers. In this commentary, Simmers outlines how they undertook the project by coaching teachers and emphasizing a growth mindset.

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Education Dive
8/15/2018

More than 90% of school district leaders across the country say their top priority for education technology is to personalize learning for students, according to a survey from the Center for Digital Education. The survey also reveals that about three-quarters of districts offer blended-learning options and more educators are expressing concern about student data and privacy issues.

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T.H.E. Journal
8/15/2018

More than $174 million in federal grant money will go to Texas schools to help with education costs for students displaced by Hurricane Harvey, said US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. The funding is part of a $359.8 million package of federal grants being given to 21 states and territories that worked with displaced students who were affected by natural disasters.

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Betsy DeVos
8/15/2018

Black boys attending California schools are 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than the all-student average, according to a report. Education researchers from San Diego State University and the University of California at Los Angeles found that suspension rates for black boys are lowest in elementary school, rise in middle school and begin to decline in high school.

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San Diego State University, UCLA
8/15/2018

NASA and the National Science Foundation are backing a study to find out what happens to carbon captured by phytoplankton after the organisms are eaten or die and how that affects Earth's climate. The Export Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing expedition, or EXPORTS, will involve more than 100 scientists and will explore dark regions of the ocean between 650 and 3,300 feet, or 198 to 1,006 meters, deep with two research vessels, underwater robots and satellite images.

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Space
8/15/2018

A once-dead gene in elephants that came back to life about 59 million years ago when the animals' ancestors started getting bigger has been linked to their ability to fend off cancer, according to findings published online by Cell Reports. The LIF6 gene works with the TP53 gene, signaling damaged cells to destroy themselves before they turn into cancer cells, researchers say.

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Science News
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Cell Reports