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7/29/2021

Some schools across the US are considering available options for the upcoming school year as the more contagious Delta variant of the coronavirus is spreading rapidly in some communities. In this article, district, school and health officials comment on the issues, including Dixie Rae Garrison, a middle-school principal in Utah who says the situation is similar "to where I was last fall, really nervous, the worst."

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Education Week
7/29/2021

The Tulsa Public Schools in Oklahoma is using federal relief funds in its summer program, focusing largely on building relationships and supporting student well-being by pairing academics with activities such as gardening, yoga and a Medieval Fight Club at a high school. Paula Shannon, the district's deputy superintendent, says this expanded learning strategy will continue through the school year.

7/29/2021

A teacher's role during the framework of the Gradual Release of Responsibility shifts as students move through the four steps, literacy coaches Sunday Cummins and Julie Webb write in this blog post. Using a writing assignment as an example, they explain how a teacher starts as a model, then transitions into a guide, resource and observer.

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MiddleWeb
7/29/2021

Trails and Overflow, a board game designed to teach players the Cree language and culture as they complete a journey, could be used to promote preservation efforts in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Ryan Schaefer and Eyzaah Bouza, both 20 years old, started creating the free game while attending a language revitalization and game development workshop in 2018.

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CBC News (Canada)
7/29/2021

Elementary-school classrooms usually are homages to reading, filled with books, nooks and quotes -- but a classroom that doesn't outwardly offer similar affection for math tells students the subject isn't important or is disliked, mathematics professor Carol Buckley writes in this commentary. Buckley suggests displaying math manipulatives, math centers and even a math museum so students and families experience similar enthusiasm for math.

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SmartBrief/Education
7/29/2021

The Center for Radical Innovation for Social Change at the University of Chicago includes the Data Science for Everyone initiative, which supports data science instruction in K-12 schools. Jeffrey Severts, co-founder and executive director of the nonprofit center, says the goal is to break out of traditional math instruction and prepare students for modern life and careers by giving them skills to better understand and use data.

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EdSurge
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University of Chicago
7/29/2021

Beginning in the fall, some high-school students in low-income school districts will be able to enroll in free cloud computing courses for college credit. The courses are available through Amazon Web Services and the nonprofit National Education Equity Lab, and students are eligible to earn AWS certification.

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Higher Ed Dive
7/29/2021

Ending a pause on student-loan payments would stall economic recovery and "bring millions of loan borrowers to the edge of financial crisis," said Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. He and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., are asking President Joe Biden to forgive up to $50,000 for student-loan borrowers.

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Bloomberg
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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Senate
7/29/2021

Exposure to early morning light for as little as 15 minutes appears to have made mice less depressed and that mood boost may be linked to a light-sensitive gene, according to findings reported in PLOS Genetics. Researchers exposed mice to light at various times over a 24-hour period to see if it would activate the Period 1 gene, which helps regulate circadian rhythms, and noticed behavioral changes when the exposure occurred in the 22nd hour of the light-dark cycle.

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The Scientist online
7/29/2021

Middle-school students attending Valour SkillZ Camp learned how to fix a flat bicycle tire, build and fly a drone and repair a lawnmower. Camp founder and Judson Middle School assistant principal Danny Stanley says the idea was to introduce students to area mentors while teaching them valuable life skills.

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Texas summer camp