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2/20/2020

Papa John's has hired executives for people, diversity and inclusion and equity in the past two years, as well as added or improved employee offerings such as tuition-free education, employee assistance programs, fitness opportunities and employee resource groups. "I wasn't part of what happened before, but I can tell you the mandate I was given was to build a great organization and, to do that, you have to start on the inside, start with a purpose," says Marvin Boakye, chief people officer.

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Forbes
2/20/2020

Pitching a startup to investors can be a delicate processes, so Rudina Seseri offers seven tips to help founders make the most of the opportunity, including demonstrating results. "Founders need to be able to show the ability to execute -- this includes sharing examples from your past, demonstrating the ability to pivot, course correct and pursue the right opportunities," Seseri writes.

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Entrepreneur online
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Rudina Seseri
2/20/2020

A new Time's Up initiative, which includes a PSA and resource guide, aims to encourage more women to join the film and TV production industries. "This PSA and our new resources work hand-in-hand to show people the world of possibilities that are out there, and that women are capable of excelling at jobs that have traditionally gone to men," Time's Up Foundation CEO and President Tina Tchen says.

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Deadline Hollywood
2/20/2020

A new video from She Is the Music, the Recording Academy and the Diversity & Inclusion Task Force, as part of the #WomenInTheMix initiative, shows a choir of women singing until only one is left standing, symbolizing that only 2% of pop music is produced by women. "I know from personal experience that, to truly move the music industry forward, we need to make a clear effort to engage and empower women," says recording artist Brandi Carlile.

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Billboard
2/20/2020

Nonprofits tend to think about capacity-building in terms of overcoming weaknesses, but they might achieve better results in the long run by focusing on building existing strengths instead, write Jeremy Avins and Nathan Huttner of Redstone Strategy Group. "With a strengths-based approach, capacity-building discussions can move beyond fixing an organization's flaws ... to transforming it into something uniquely great," they write.

2/20/2020

Identity theft has been a problem for years, and credit report changes, such as unfamiliar charges and accounts, can be a sign of trouble. Other signs include rejected or unexpected medical claims and refused personal checks.

2/20/2020

Police say impostor scams, which cost victims $667 million last year, are the top fraud they're informed of. In one case, an 80-year-old Oregon widower lost $200,000 when a scammer stole a Florida woman's identity, befriended the man and convinced him to invest in what the scammer claimed was a business.

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Seaside Signal (Ore.)
2/20/2020

You're ready for leadership if you're comfortable confronting people about their performance, are decisive and want to help people succeed, writes Wally Bock. Try out a leadership role on a project or at a nonprofit before committing to a full-time role.

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Lead Change
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Wally Bock
2/20/2020

CEOs must use collaboration and alliances in pursuit of sustainability because no company can do much on its own, says Lorna Davis, a former senior adviser to Danone. "This is important because the old way for CEOs was that they tackled only goals that they could control: 'my people, my factories, plastic containers' and so on," Davis says.

2/20/2020

The US auto industry will have to rethink its supply chain strategies in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak and consider moves such as diversifying suppliers and keeping extra inventory on hand. Llamasoft CEO Razat Gaurav says the crisis means automakers should "consider tradeoffs between operating on that lean principle and carrying some of that buffer inventory you need during unfortunate situations like this."

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Forbes