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9/23/2020

Health care providers have to insert long strings of text into patients' medical records to ensure nothing about the encounter is omitted and all legal bases are covered, but much of the text has little or nothing to do with actual patient care, writes physician Fred Pelzman. Instead of check boxes and macros, health care providers should be able to simply "put down what the patient told us, what we asked and what they answered, what we examined, what we thought, and what we want to do next," Pelzman writes.

9/23/2020

Regina Barzilay, who studies artificial intelligence at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, developed a deep learning model for breast cancer screening, risk modeling and diagnosis after her own experience with breast cancer. The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence and Squirrel AI Learning awarded Barzilay the inaugural $1 million Squirrel AI Award for Artificial Intelligence to Benefit Humanity for her work on AI for early cancer detection, drug discovery and other health care applications.

9/23/2020

A study in Radiology Case Reports describes a 40-year-old woman with colitis whose stomach and pelvic CT scan showed ascending colon and caecum mucosal enhancement and mural thickening, as well as bilateral ground-glass opacities and other COVID-19-related features in the base of the lungs. The patient was later confirmed to have COVID-19, and her imaging findings were resolved two weeks after receiving COVID-19 treatment. The findings should prompt radiologists to be aware of COVID-19-related gastrointestinal symptoms to avoid missed diagnoses, researchers wrote.

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Radiology Business
9/23/2020

The CMS' provision of new technology add-on payment status for a radiology artificial intelligence algorithm signifies recognition of the value of medical imaging AI software in patient care and may lead to reimbursement for other radiology AI applications, says Dr. Eliot Siegel of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Michael Cannavo of Image Management Consultants says the radiology AI market is poised to grow due to CMS reimbursement.

9/23/2020

Domestic swine might be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, according to a study posted before peer review on the preprint server bioRxiv by scientists at Iowa State University, the University of Manitoba and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. However, another study by researchers at Kansas State University confirmed prior studies showing that pigs are not susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The breeds and ages of the pigs in the different studies could be factors in susceptibility, as could the dosage, and both research teams say more studies are needed.

9/23/2020

A startup established by Australia's scientific research agency is developing a bovine dietary supplement from asparagopsis that scientists say reduces methane emissions. Bromoform in the seaweed prevents the production of gas as cows digest their food, and another startup based on the East coast of Tasmania is farming high-bromoform asparagopsis in the ocean and on land.

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CNN
9/23/2020

Ann Giles and Lu Wallace, operators of various Kentucky-based health care-related companies, were sentenced to 30 months and 33 months, respectively, and were ordered to pay almost $1.6 million in restitution after both pleading guilty to conspiring to defraud the US. According to the plea, the defendants deliberately failed to pay IRS-mandated trust fund taxes after the taxes were withheld from the paychecks of their employees.

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Department of Justice
9/23/2020

Mikayla Tolbert of Montgomery, Ala., was charged with four counts of financial exploitation of elderly and six counts of criminal impersonation. Authorities said Tolbert pretended to be a nurse employed by Baptist South, and then financially exploited elderly individuals.

9/23/2020

A study in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care found that type 2 diabetes patients who were evening chronotypes -- or those who go to sleep and wake up later -- were more likely to have higher sedentary time and lower levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, both of which put their health at greater risk, compared with those who were morning chronotypes. Lead researcher Joseph Henson also said evening chronotypes exercise 56% less than their morning counterparts.

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Medical Dialogues
9/23/2020

Johnson & Johnson launched Phase III of a clinical trial on a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine and expects to report results by the end of the year, according to chief scientific officer Paul Stoffels. The company also posted a detailed clinical trial protocol on its website.

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Reuters