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11/21/2019

A study published in BMJ Open found that antidepressant use among pregnant women was linked to a 1.19 increased risk of gestational diabetes, with women taking venlafaxine and amitriptyline having the highest risk at 1.27 and 1.52, respectively. The researchers used data from 229,955 women for the study and suggested that the "adverse outcomes associated with antidepressant use during pregnancy, including gestational diabetes, should be weighed against the consequences of nonmedicated depression, especially for women with severe depression."

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venlafaxine
11/21/2019

A study published in Diabetes Care found that transgender men's insulin sensitivity increased while transgender women's insulin sensitivity decreased after one year of gender-affirming hormone therapy. Analyzing data from 90 participants, the researchers found that the insulin sensitivity of the participants "mostly paralleled changes in lean body mass as well as altered incretin responses to [an] oral glucose tolerance test," and they said that "it might be advisable to monitor insulin sensitivity parameters regularly in transgender people after gender-affirming hormone therapy."

11/21/2019

A Japanese study published in Diabetic Medicine found that 33.3% of patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity and sarcopenia had more than 30% estimated glomerular filtration rate reduction over four years, which was higher than the eGFR reduction in diabetes patients with just one or neither condition. Using data from 745 patients, the researchers also found that the risk of having an eGFR reduction greater than 30% was 4.52 times higher in patients with obesity and sarcopenia, compared with those with neither condition, with a higher risk also seen among those with just one of the conditions.

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sarcopenia
11/21/2019

A study published in Pediatrics found that teenagers with severe obesity who had metabolic and bariatric surgery reported better quality of life, and every 10% reduction in body mass index was linked to 10% lower odds of joint pain and 6% lower odds of musculoskeletal pain at three years. The study used data from 242 teenagers who had weight-loss surgery at age 17 on average.

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Reuters
11/21/2019

A study in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health found that exercise referral schemes, which can improve the activity levels of patients at risk for chronic conditions, did not significantly improve patients' resting heart rate, diastolic blood pressure and body mass index at six weeks to three months. The researchers used data from 23,731 active participants in 13 different ERSs and found that systolic blood pressure and mental wellbeing were the two outcomes that could produce potential significant changes.

11/21/2019

White House spokesman Judd Deere said President Donald Trump will meet Friday with public health advocates and vaping industry representatives as the administration considers a possible ban on flavored vaping products. "The policy making process is not stalled -- it continues to move forward," Deere noted.

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Reuters, CNBC
11/21/2019

Tennessee is seeking the Trump administration's approval to transform its Medicaid program into the nation's first block grant program. Under the proposal, the state would receive almost $7.9 billion from the federal government, a figure that is based on estimated Medicaid costs, but the amount could increase based on enrollment changes and inflation.

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The Hill
11/21/2019

Twenty-one percent of adolescents ages 12 to 17 and 32.2% of young adults ages 18 to 25 reported using prescription opioids in the past year, with opioid use higher among females than males, according to a study in PLOS Medicine. Researchers reviewed 2015-2016 data involving 56,070 teens and young adults from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health and found that 55.7% of those who reported opioid misuse obtained the drug from relatives or friends, while health care was the source for 25.4% of them.

11/21/2019

An analysis of heart disease mortality among adults ages 25 to 64 showed counties with worsening economic conditions such as lack of affordable housing, high jobless rates and lower median incomes saw their heart disease death rates climb from 122 deaths per 100,000 people in 2010 to 127.6 per 100,000 in 2015, while rates remained stable in counties with the least economic distress. The findings, presented at the American Heart Association's annual meeting, show that "large economic trends -- whether it's a significant reduction in employment or a recession -- have a real impact on communities and on the cardiovascular health of people living in those communities," lead author Dr. Sameed Khatana said.

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HealthDay News
11/21/2019

Baltimore-based insurer CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield said it will be awarding $2.15 million in grants over two years to organizations working to improve maternal and pediatric health outcomes in the greater Washington, D.C., area. Over 10,000 underinsured and low-income people are expected to benefit from the grants.