All Education News
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/22/2017

Colleges and universities should recruit more low-income students, because research shows when they attend and graduate from highly selective schools, they are a boon to the economy, writes Daniel Porterfield, president of Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa. In this commentary, he outlines how some schools have made progress in boosting enrollment of low-income students.

Full Story:
The Hechinger Report
11/22/2017

Rhode Island's three public colleges will now be funded based on performance in areas such as graduation rates and the number of students pursuing degrees in high-demand job areas. With this new plan, state colleges will receive an additional $50 million in state funding over five years to help reach their graduation rate benchmarks and other targets.

11/22/2017

Dark streaks seen on Martian slopes may not be evidence of water after all, according to findings published in Nature Geoscience. Instead, the streaks may be caused by granular material such as sand flowing down the sides of hills after they've reached a particular height, researchers say.

Full Story:
Space
More Summaries:
Nature Geoscience
11/22/2017

Blue whales, who normally exhibit a right-side bias, change to a left-side bias when feeding on small crustaceans, according to findings published in Current Biology. Researchers attached cameras, hydrophones and sensors to blue whales and noticed that they typically roll to the left during feeding, likely to allow their dominant right eye to more effectively go after krill.

11/22/2017

Researchers in Penticton, British Columbia, have received a grant of approximately $71,360 from the Canadian Rheumatology Association. Funding will go toward developing treatments to help fibromyalgia patients manage their pain.

11/22/2017

The Delaware Center for Neuroscience Research, a collaboration between the University of Delaware and Delaware State University, has been awarded a $10.9 million grant from the NIH to examine brain function. Research topics will include brain changes due to traumatic stress, as well as neurodegeneration in people with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

11/22/2017

A bovine birth simulator -- which is on display at a trade show in Canada, is the same size as a cow and has a working udder, uterus and full-size calf -- will be used to teach veterinary medicine students how to deal with birth complications. The cow "is a great way to get kids interested in asking questions and understanding where their food comes from," adds veterinarian Chris Clark, associate dean of the University of Saskatchewan's Western College of Veterinary Medicine.

Full Story:
CBC News (Canada)
11/22/2017

Some South Carolina school districts are juggling their schedules or asking teachers to give up their planning periods to deal with an educator shortage. Low salaries and challenging working conditions are the two main reasons teachers are leaving, says Fran Welch, dean of the College of Charleston School of Education, Health and Human Performance.

11/22/2017

Before implementing digital tools in a school, a principal should know how the tools work with the school's pedagogical frame and if research confirms the technology's efficacy, writes Eric Sheninger, a senior fellow with the International Center for Leadership in Education. In this commentary, he offers questions and guidance for principals considering new technologies.

Full Story:
EdTech online
11/22/2017

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has signed an executive order that may force some state school districts to consolidate administrative functions. Fallin says the goal is make education spending more efficient, but critics say the state should be investing more in education.

Full Story:
Tulsa World (Okla.)
More Summaries:
Gov. Mary Fallin