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3/27/2017

People with diabetes had significantly reduced numbers of small blood vessels around the heart, increasing their risk of heart attack, compared with those without diabetes, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. German researchers experimented on animals and used genetic therapy to stimulate the growth of pericytes, which helped with the growth of functional and lasting blood vessels.

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Diabetes.co.uk (U.K.)
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blood vessels, diabetes, heart attack
3/27/2017

A study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism showed that women with increased pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A concentrations had a lower risk of developing gestational diabetes and had reduced insulin resistance at week 28, compared with those with lower concentrations of plasma protein-A. UK researchers analyzed serum samples from 821 pregnant women and found that pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A was negatively associated with both week 28 fasting glucose concentrations and 60-minute glucose concentrations.

3/27/2017

In the uncertainty following the withdrawal of House Republicans' attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, some White House officials and lawmakers suggested the door could be open for a bipartisan effort to address health care. "With the demise of the House bill, there's a real window of opportunity for a bipartisan approach to health care," said Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine.

3/27/2017

Only 20% of teens with eating disorders pursued treatment, researchers reported in the International Journal of Eating Disorders. The findings, based on a cross-sectional study involving youths ages 13 to 18 in the US, showed higher odds of seeking treatment among girls and those with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, compared with boys and those with binge-eating disorder.

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Bulimia
3/27/2017

Registered dietitians say the naturally occurring sugar contained in whole fruit has essential vitamins and does not have the same effect on the body as the sugar contained in candy or snacks. RD Jim White said sugar in fruit contains fiber that helps it break down more slowly, reducing the effect on blood sugar levels and the likelihood the energy will be stored as fat.

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blood sugar, Jim White
3/27/2017

Massachusetts General Hospital and the nonprofit Community Servings in Boston are studying whether providing home-delivered, medically tailored meals to people with chronic diseases can help reduce hospitalizations and health costs. Community Servings is provided information on patients' medical concerns, and its dietitians design a meal plan from 17 medical diets created for specific health conditions.

3/27/2017

Clinical psychologists say eating right before bedtime or middle-of-the night snacking can throw off the body's circadian rhythm and digestive system, and may lead to weight gain. Registered dietitian nutritionist Angel Planells says having a snack an hour to 90 minutes before bed is OK as long as it is not too rich or heavy, and could provide a way for people to get nutrients they missed during the day.

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USA Today
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circadian rhythm, RDN, Angel Planells
3/27/2017

Children who survived brain cancer had increased overall fat tissue, particularly in the abdomen, despite having similar body mass index, compared with those who didn't have cancer, according to a Canadian study in Scientific Reports. Researchers said that such elevated body fat among pediatric brain cancer survivors could increase their risk of stroke, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and early mortality.

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brain cancer, body mass index
3/27/2017

Short bursts of high-intensity exercise may yield greater cardiometabolic benefits than longer periods of lighter physical activity for overweight children with high insulin levels, according to a study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center researcher Justin Moore said as little as 10 minutes per day of intense physical activity may help children achieve or maintain cardiac and metabolic health.