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7/17/2019

UK researchers developed a protocol for reducing hypoglycemic medications in patients with type 2 diabetes who improved their glycemic control by following a low-carbohydrate diet. The protocol, outlined in the British Journal of General Practice, suggested some patients may be able to stop taking insulin over time as insulin resistance is resolved.

7/17/2019

Six of 13 bats whose population had been decimated by white-nose syndrome survived winter after they were sprayed with Pseudomonas fluorescens, an antifungal bacterium that naturally exists on bats' skin, while only one of the 13 untreated bats survived, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The researchers built on a previous study using probiotics to help amphibians resist chytrid fungus infections, says study leader Joseph Hoyt.

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Big Think, Science News
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Joseph Hoyt
7/17/2019

Police in Loretto, Tenn., posted a notice on their Facebook page asking residents to help protect wildlife by not flushing methamphetamines and other drugs down the toilet. Waterfowl frequent the town's wastewater treatment ponds, alligators downstream could also be affected, "and we shudder to think what one all hyped up on meth would do," the post said.

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CNN
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Facebook
7/17/2019

As temperatures across the nation soar, the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection reminds people to keep pets at home in the shade, air conditioning or a cool basement, and never leave them in a parked car. Livestock should have access to shade and ample fresh water, enclosures should be well ventilated, and animals should not be transported in hot, humid conditions.

7/17/2019

A multidisciplinary study published in the Royal Society Interface Journal explains the biomechanics of hoof development and how physical and biological conditions can cause abnormal growth.

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VetSurgeon (UK)
7/17/2019

African forest elephants, which are smaller than African bush elephants, feed on saplings, young trees and early succession plants, and their feeding habits promote the dominance of trees with high wood density and high carbon storage potential, researchers reported in Nature Geoscience. The population of forest elephants has declined to less than 10% of its potential size, and the researchers concluded that allowing forest elephants to go extinct would exacerbate global climate change.

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Nature Geoscience
7/17/2019

A Swedish briard dog born with Leber's congenital amaurosis that was one of six dogs successfully treated with an experimental gene therapy has died at 12 years old. The genetic condition is a common cause of blindness in children, and the gene therapy was tested in people -- and eventually approved -- after its safety and efficacy was demonstrated in dogs, including Venus, who went on to be adopted by a couple who worked on the research team.

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Leber
7/17/2019

Patrick Ifediba, a doctor and former owner of Birmingham, Ala.-based Care Complete Medical Clinic, and his sister and licensed practical nurse Ngozi Ozuligbo, were found guilty of multiple counts of health care fraud and other charges for their involvement in a $7.8 million health care fraud and pill mill scheme. Trial evidence showed Ifediba improperly prescribed opioids and dangerous combinations of prescription drugs to his patients and conspired with Ozuligbo and others to submit fraudulent claims to Medicare and private insurers for medically unnecessary allergy tests and treatments.

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Department of Justice
7/17/2019

Cindy Dahdah, owner of a medical and dental billing firm in Beavercreek, Ohio, was sentenced to a five-year prison term after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit health care fraud and other charges in a $2 million-plus health care fraud scheme. Court records showed Cindy Dadhah conspired with her late cardiologist husband, Salim Dahdah, to cause the submission of over 2,000 false claims totaling about $2 million to Medicare, Medicaid and Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield for medically unnecessary tests and procedures from 2007 to 2015.

7/17/2019

Orlando, Fla.-based Taylor's Pharmacy, also known as Florida Discount Drugs, reached a $107,500 settlement with the US government to resolve accusations that it failed to comply with the recordkeeping requirements of the Controlled Substances Act. The settlement also resolves allegations that the pharmacy illegally distributed schedule III and IV controlled substances to individuals not registered to receive those medications.

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Department of Justice