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10/16/2018

A company might change its name to reflect evolving consumer tastes, connect with a younger audience or recover from a public relations crisis, but take care to avoid alienating longtime customers, says Americus Reed and Patti Williams, Wharton marketing professors. "There's something called 'just noticeable difference,' where you're just trying to make these little, tiny changes and not shocking consumers because they're using these cues that identify you," says Reed.

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Knowledge@Wharton
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Americus Reed, Patti Williams
10/16/2018

Confidence came easy to Kara Swisher, co-founder of Recode and co-founder of AllThingsD at the Wall Street Journal, and she describes her early days in journalism as well as why she prefers focusing on her work than managing others. "I just remember thinking, 'I'm not more experienced than these guys are, but I'm going to be bigger than they are someday,'" she says.

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Slate
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Kara Swisher
10/16/2018

BASE Hologram has had success with creating holograms of deceased performers such as Roy Orbison in the past, and the company will be creating a show with the likeness of the late singer Amy Winehouse in 2019, according to Mitch Winehouse, Amy's father. The family of the singer will have the final input on the performance, and proceeds from the show will go to the Amy Winehouse Foundation, a charity that seeks to help young people with substance-abuse issues.

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Reuters
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Amy Winehouse, Amy
10/16/2018

During President Donald Trump's "60 Minutes" interview Sunday, a shot showed a painting hanging in the White House of Trump with nine other Republican presidents gathered around a table having drinks. Trump apparently liked the painting of himself -- in which he's having a Diet Coke with presidents including Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Reagan and Theodore Roosevelt -- so much that he asked artist Andy Thomas for a print.

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TIME online
10/16/2018

Leaders will arrive at better solutions if they look at problems through a variety of perspectives, writes Joel Garfinkle. "Your credentials in your field are already established; now it's your turn to draw ideas out of others and build effective leadership qualities in those below you," he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Joel Garfinkle
10/16/2018

The idea of purpose has merit, but it's often conflated with hitting goals and leaves people feeling empty and unfulfilled, writes recently retired professor Nigel Nicholson. When vision "lures appetites and pulls desires into existence that have no deep foundation, it courts a serious risk of the hollowing out of identity instead of its enhancing it," he writes.

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Nigel Nicholson
10/16/2018

Inclusivity and its emphasis on individuality is essential for corporate growth, but it's a difficult mindset to adopt for many brands set in old ways of governance and consumer outreach, writes Glenn Llopis. Companies are inclusive when they learn the values and desires of these stakeholders, cater to the ones they share and train employees to welcome everyone's perspective, he writes.

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Forbes
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Glenn Llopis
10/16/2018

Negotiations preceded with an introductory handshake fared better than those that didn't, according to a research paper. "“And if your instinct is not to shake, that’s OK, but can you think of another signal of cooperation to send?," says Michael Norton of Harvard Business School.

10/16/2018

The best digital platform designs avoid overwhelming users with too many choices, a complicated onboarding process or an unfamiliar design pattern, writes interaction designer Jon Yablonski. Help users retain information by grouping similar points in small chunks, he writes, and remember that the duty of designers "is to create products and experiences that support and align with the goals and well-being of users."

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A List Apart
10/16/2018

Jeff Garmire quit his job in April to try and become the second person to complete the 7,000-mile Great Western Loop that starts in California, crosses the Continental Divide and ends in the Arizona desert, writes Colleen Stinchcombe. With 1,900 miles to go, Garmire has avoided the worst snowy seasons while climbing as high as 14,505 feet.