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6/26/2019

Legacy brands can be more boon than burden to business transformation if leaders home in on their purpose, writes Mike Leiser. Such attention to purpose helps in a modern environment that requires balancing disintegrating trust in brands with growing brand activism, he writes.

6/26/2019

An audience will absorb your speech best if you trust the strongest parts of your natural personality, writes Jim Anderson. "If we try to use another personality, then we'll come across as being unfocused," he writes.

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Jim Anderson
6/26/2019

Businesses that deliver what they promise are primed for long-term success more than those that rely on gimmicks, writes Philip Piletic. "Once you develop a group of happy customers, they'll be sure to keep coming back," he writes.

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CustomerThink
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Philip Piletic
6/26/2019

The approximately 8,500 Jazzercise franchises owe their existence to 75-year-old founder Judi Sheppard Missett, who started dancing at age 3 after a doctor recommended it to her parents to cure her pigeon-toe condition. Missett says she keeps routines fresh by watching her granddaughters dance and checking out music videos.

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Glamour online
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Jazzercise
6/26/2019

Each time you have a career choice to make, consider the risk and reward, the short- and long-term outcomes, and alternative paths, writes Vicki Walia. "It is important that we be open to embracing new career opportunities, and, when the moment is right, consider taking risks and pursue some new challenges," Walia states.

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Glassdoor
6/26/2019

If your voice and ideas are going unnoticed on the job -- maybe you're quiet or work remotely -- there are actions you can take to overcome the issue, says Robin Madell. Get noticed by following up on a problem, using visuals, making your case, telling stories, networking, and writing, Madell writes.

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Robin Madell
6/26/2019

The quality of your follow-up email can make a difference in whether or not you receive a reply, writes Allen Gannett. Make your email relatable, personal and short, and follow the 3x3 rule, says Gannett.

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Fast Company online
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Allen Gannett
6/26/2019

You can quickly learn about the culture of your new company by searching the Slack archives, says Nick Douglas. Search your own name, the person you're replacing, and your job title to get a heads up on your new position, Douglas writes.

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Lifehacker
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Nick Douglas
6/26/2019

Make sure you bring your best you into your new job, and leave the negativity from your last position behind, states Kourtney Whitehead. The bad work environment likely affected some of your personal relationships so "be sure to thank the supporters that stood by you and helped you get to this fresh start," she writes.

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Forbes
6/26/2019

Ryne Melcher, the track and field coach at a Vancouver high school, made a bet with his students; if they won a championship title for the second year with more points than the last, he would run 100 kilometers on the school's track. The team held up their end by winning the title by 43 more points than the previous year, and Melcher kept his promise by taking 250 laps over 13 hours, with many of his athletes and community members joining in the run.

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Runner's World online