All Education News
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/19/2020

There are approximately 4.9 million students in K-12 schools in the US who are English-language learners, about 1 million more than two decades ago, according to a report from the US Department of Education. That represents about 9.6% of the total student population.

2/19/2020

Elizabeth Matlick, an English and writing teacher in Washington state, decided to overhaul her grading processes when she realized they were unsustainable and ineffective at producing results from students. In this commentary, Matlick shares how consulting research helped her understand the barriers students face with feedback and create processes that boosted student agency.

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EdSurge
2/19/2020

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative has announced a new round of grant funding that moves its focus away from education technology. The announcement comes after a $100 million investment two years ago in the online learning platform Summit Learning drew criticism.

2/19/2020

High-school students in Colorado are working to restore and preserve the site of an internment camp where people of Japanese descent and Japanese Americans were held during World War II. Teacher John Hopper guides the students who have been interviewing residents who remembered the camp and survivors who were held at the site, where little remains of a square mile space that held as many as 7,300 internees at its peak.

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NBC News
2/19/2020

Math teachers should lean into calculators as a tool, according to National Board Certified Teacher Kelly Baum-Sehon. In this blog post, the middle-school math teacher shares lesson plans that use calculators to spark mathematical curiosity, foster understanding and build fluency related to percentages and fractions among students.

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Edutopia
2/19/2020

Two social studies teachers from Maine are among 11 who will participate in the PolarTREC program, which pairs environmental scientists and teachers to build lesson plans that highlight the cultural, social and political effects of climate change. Erin Towns will study the effects of surface runoff in Greenland, while Jenn Heidrich will learn about Arctic ecosystem biodiversity and carbon sequestration in the Yukon.

2/19/2020

A Massachusetts district's students are applying their STEM skills and knowledge to solve problems. At one school, seventh-graders taking a required engineering course were challenged to come up with devices that would help people with disabilities, and some will be shown to hospitals for professional evaluation and feedback.

2/19/2020

Three National Association for College Admission Counseling provisions the Justice Department objected to were in place to help standardize the admission process, aid colleges in enrollment management and limit student "poaching," write Hamilton College President David Wippman and Glenn Altschuler of Cornell University. NACAC members say the rules are in the best interest of both colleges and students, and students and parents should be concerned that the Justice Department views schools as businesses selling services and students as consumers, Wippman and Altschuler write in this opinion piece.

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The Hill
2/19/2020

Researchers working to provide gender equity for Hubble Space Telescope researchers learned that it's most effective to eliminate identifying information from proposals and require scientists to write in a way that further obscures personal style. Female scientists' proposals scored a bit better than men once the dual anonymization was in place, whereas male lead scientists had prevailed before.

2/19/2020

Eighth-grade students in a Kentucky district recently visited an area high school to learn about career pathway programs available to them, including animal science and marketing. Officials say the event is focused on helping students consider "next steps" after high school, including college and career.