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4/23/2019

Google has signaled it is entering the field of artificial intelligence in health care, and one analyst says the company has likely already invested billions of dollars. Greg Corrado, a Google research scientist, says AI and machine learning can be applied to numerous tasks, including "the kinds of tasks that doctors, nurses, clinicians and patients face every day."

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National Public Radio
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Google
4/23/2019

A study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that adults who said they never eat breakfast had an 87% higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, especially stroke-related death, than those who eat breakfast daily, regardless of body mass index, CV risk factors and socioeconomic status. The authors evaluated 1988 to 1994 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and noted research has found an association between skipping breakfast and risk factors such as high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, obesity and type 2 diabetes.

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CNN
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metabolic syndrome
4/23/2019

Forty percent of people with cancer used marijuana during the previous year, compared with 38% of those who didn't have cancer, and those with cancer also had increased odds of using prescription opioids, researchers reported in the journal Cancer. The findings also showed that overall marijuana use rose between 2005 and 2014, with the increase likely due to changes in laws that made the drug more widely available, but cancer diagnosis wasn't significantly associated with substance abuse risk during that period.

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HealthDay News
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cancer, marijuana
4/23/2019

A study by the University of Missouri's School of Social Work found a link between having breakfast as a family and children's positive body image. A causal connection wasn't established, but "what we do know is that in terms of body image, relationship with family matters," says Virginia Ramseyer Winter, director of the school's Center for Body Image Research and Policy.

4/23/2019

Given the size of the investment involved and its potential effect on one's career, the decision of switching to a new EHR system is typically made by hospital CIOs after asking their peers about their experiences with the technology. Executives say they also rely on rankings provided by research groups and check free-form comments other providers include in survey answers.

4/23/2019

Leaders who take time for weekly reflection -- and encourage their teams to do the same -- will see an improvement in overall performance, writes Alaina Love, CEO of Purpose Linked Consulting. Take a walk outside, she recommends, and journal about any insights.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Alaina Love
4/23/2019

While top-tier executives may seem to be the most attractive targets for cybercriminals, lower-level engineering and research and development staffers are more commonly used to hack into companies to gather data, a Proofpoint survey has found. Also, criminals' use of fraudulent social media accounts has grown recently.

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Dark Reading
4/23/2019

Children and adolescents who did not drink water were more likely to consume 4.5% more calories from sweetened beverages, such as juice, sodas and sports drinks, and an extra 93 calories daily, compared with those who drink water, researchers reported in JAMA Pediatrics. Based on 2011-2016 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey involving 8,400 youths ages 2 to 19, findings showed that Caucasian children who didn't drink water consumed an extra 122 calories from sugary beverages, while African American and Hispanic children consumed an extra 93 calories and 61 calories, respectively.

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CNN
4/23/2019

Researchers recruited 37 patients with type 1 diabetes and overweight or obesity, ages 12 to 19, and found significantly greater improvements in peripheral and whole-body insulin sensitivity among those who added metformin to their insulin therapy for three months, compared with those on placebo. The findings were published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Endocrinology Advisor
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metformin, Obesity
4/23/2019

Type 2 diabetes patients with hyperlipidemia or mixed dyslipidemia who were taking a maximum-tolerated dose of statin had a 54.3% reduction in LDL cholesterol levels from baseline after taking evolocumab for 12 weeks, compared with a 1.1% drop among those on placebo, according to a study in Diabetologia. Based on a post-hoc analysis of the BANTING trial involving 421 individuals, mean age of 62, the study also showed evolocumab treatment led to a 46.9% decrease in non-HDL cholesterol at week 12 and improved levels of other lipids.

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hyperlipidemia, dyslipidemia