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3/19/2019

Registered nurse Reynaldo De La Cruz created a perioperative nurse residency program to help Greenwich Hospital in Connecticut fill operating room positions, after recruiters had trouble hiring experienced nurses due to the facility's proximity to Manhattan. RWJBarnabas Health in New Jersey and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston also have used residency programs to address staffing issues.

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Nurse
3/19/2019

Adults with chronic periodontitis were 6% more likely to develop dementia, compared with healthy peers, even after accounting for physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption, according to a South Korean study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The findings were based on data from 262,349 people who were at least 50 years old and were followed from 2005 to 2015.

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EurekAlert!
3/19/2019

Boston Medical Center researchers found a significant association between low amyloid beta and tau protein levels in eye fluid and reduced cognitive scores, and some individuals whose eye fluid had low biomarker protein levels exhibited mild to moderate dementia symptoms. The findings in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease "could help us build an accessible and minimally invasive test to determine Alzheimer's disease risk, especially among patients with eye disease," said researcher Dr. Lauren Wright.

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Medical Xpress
3/19/2019

Radiologists in the US had an average yearly salary of $394,034 in 2018, with interventional radiologists earning more than diagnostic radiologists, regardless of subspecialization, according to AuntMinnie.com's SalaryScan survey. The poll also showed that nuclear medicine/PET radiologists earned $388,492 annually on average, which was higher only than those who subspecialized in mammography, but nuclear medicine/PET radiologic technologists had the best annual compensation at $80,779 on average.

3/19/2019

Workforce diversity, face time with patients, regulatory burdens and rising annual costs are some of the challenges facing cardiologists, American College of Cardiology immediate past president Dr. C. Michael Valentine told the ACC Scientific Session. Valentine said obesity and diabetes are factors in the reversal of 30 years of decline in mortality from cardiovascular disease and that preventing the growth of CVD risk factors and increasing cardiology's diversity are major priorities.

3/19/2019

A study presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session showed safety-net hospitals were more likely to be penalized for 30-day heart failure readmissions and had average penalties of 0.7% compared with 0.51% for hospitals in high-income areas. Researcher Sameed Ahmed Khatana said under the 21st Century Cures Act, CMS in fiscal 2019 starts to account for socioeconomic factors in its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, which will lead to fewer penalties for safety-net hospitals but more penalties for other hospitals.

3/19/2019

Social workers Cheryl Griffin and Marsha Burks reflect during National Professional Social Work Month on their continuous contact with people at the most vulnerable, frightening and critical moments of their lives. The colleagues in Taylor, Mich., say the range and depth of social work vastly exceed the public's perceptions.

3/19/2019

Field education for social workers is changing as more online programming has become available, while social media has created new ethical considerations and interdisciplinary efforts have increased, write Kimberly Gibson and Mary Jacque Carroll. "Being able to adapt to innovative shifts and technological advances offers varied learning opportunities for all students," say the authors.

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Social Work Today
3/19/2019

The deployment of police-social worker teams to help the homeless has taken a tougher tack in Arlington, Wash., than in Seattle, and officials say results support the approach. A less lenient policy toward prosecution of minor offenses is reflected in lower crime and fewer encampments, police chief Jonathan Ventura asserts.

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KCPQ-TV (Seattle)
3/19/2019

Delaware would increase the ranks of counselors, psychologists and mental health professionals in elementary schools and create health centers in "high needs" high schools under bills proposed by two legislators. Supporters cite national data showing the high incidence of mental illness among the young and point to its links to school failure, crime and death by suicide.