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1/22/2019

A Denver-based nonprofit and two Colorado universities are drawing from neuroscience to prepare teachers to assist students who have experienced psychological and emotional trauma. Well-informed teachers are critically needed, experts say, because counselors are in drastically short supply.

1/22/2019

Amid a rise in anxiety and depression, college students are increasingly keeping emotional support animals, according to some reports. On-campus housing officials have policies governing service animals, which have had special training and have a definition in the Americans With Disabilities Act, and some are requiring physician's notes for support animals, which are primarily intended to provide emotional reassurance.

1/22/2019

Two licensed clinical social workers in Broomfield, Colo., are offering free group therapy sessions to those touched by the federal government shutdown. "We know people in the community are experiencing higher levels of stress," says Pamela Boaz, who is teaming up with social worker Cameron James.

1/22/2019

Providers and advocates have hailed the appointment of Tony Lourey as Minnesota Department of Human Services commissioner, citing his focus on behavioral health issues as a four-term state senator. "I can't imagine a better space for me personally with my background to really come in and improve the lives of Minnesotans," Lourey says.

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MinnPost
1/22/2019

Nursing schools are using simulation training to help students understand when a patient is near death and to learn to work with family members going through a difficult time. Belmont University Professor Sara Camp said nursing students are comfortable with skills such as IV insertion and giving medications, but when it comes to dying patients the focus is on communication, which can be challenging.

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National Public Radio
1/22/2019

Health care attorney and registered nurse Nancy Brent said nurses are responsible for their own professional documentation and a key principle in nursing is that it be accurate and truthful. When nurses document for another nurse they must indicate it and sign their name after the notation.

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Nurse
1/22/2019

The Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center (HPCC), a national organization located in Pittsburgh, is seeking a Director of Credentialing. This energetic and customer-oriented person will direct the administration, operations and program development of the credentialing organization. As HPCC's Director of Credentialing you will provide direction and oversight of multiple professional certification programs and develop initiatives to promote the value of certification to nurses and other healthcare professionals. Apply on the HPNA Career Center.

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HPCC
1/22/2019

HPNA, HPNF and HPCC are seeking a visionary nursing leader to serve as chief executive officer for the enterprise. The CEO is responsible for the fiscal and operational oversight and strategic planning for the three organizations and accountable for the implementation of the policies adopted by the Boards of Directors. In this highly visible position, the CEO will influence partnerships and opportunities to promote the mission, vision and key priorities of the enterprise. See the full position description and apply at the HPNA Career Center.

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Boards of Directors
1/22/2019

US and German researchers found that individuals with an Alzheimer's disease-risk allele had elevated levels of neurofilament light chain protein, which has been linked to brain damage, in their blood and cerebrospinal fluid at baseline, as well as greater gains in NfL levels more than 16 years before Alzheimer's onset, compared with those without the allele. The findings in Nature Medicine also showed shrinking of the precuneus and worse cognitive test scores among those with increasing NfL levels, prompting researchers to suggest the use of NfL as a biomarker for monitoring Alzheimer's progression.

1/22/2019

Nearly six times as many men as women held leadership and professorial positions in academic nuclear medicine in the US and Canada, despite similar numbers of citations, published articles and total research years in the two groups across all professorial levels, according to a study in the American Journal of Roentgenology. "The results show the need for devising strategies to promote diversity in academic and leadership positions across nuclear medicine specialists," researchers wrote.